Community College of Rhode Island

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Program & Course Student Learning Outcomes

Program Outcomes for Majors:

Law Enforcement Majors:
Upon completion of the program, students are expected to know and be able to:

  1. write clear, effective, and conventional English in the preparation of written assignments so that students will capable of maintaining proper notes and proper written reports in the performance of their future jobs;
  2. apply critical thinking skills in the reading and interpretation of legal materials (statues, court decisions);
  3. understand the legal concepts and terminology in substantive area of criminal law;
  4. have a basic knowledge of procedural rules and evidentiary rules and understand the relationship between procedural rules and substantive law;
  5. demonstrate a solid grasp of constitutional law principles as they relate to law enforcement, and in particular search & seizure law, the law on confessions, and the law on assistance of counsel.
  6. have a thorough knowledge of crime scene investigation and demonstrate a knowledge of forensics by law enforcement agencies used in criminal investigations.

Paralegal Studies Majors:
Upon completion of the the program, students are expected to know and be able to:

  1. write clear, effective, and conventional English in the preparation of memorandums, briefs, substantive legal documents, and litigation documents;
  2. apply critical thinking skills in the reading and interpretation of legal materials (statutes, court decisions, legal documents, litigation documents);
  3. understand the legal concepts and terminology in substantive areas of the law studied (contracts, property, estates, torts, business organizations);
  4. have a basic knowledge of procedural rules in both the civil and criminal areas of the law and understand the relationship between procedural rules and substantive law;
  5. draft appropriate documents needed by a lawyer or law firm in civil litigation matters including pleadings, motions, and discovery documents
  6. conduct research on legal topics and questions using primary legal materials (constitutions, statutes, court decisions, and regulations)

Course Student Learning Outcomes:

Introduction to Law Enforcement (Laws 1000)

 As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following:

  1. Explain the rich, colorful history of policing, as well the historical foundations of American policing
  2. Explain the numerous federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies their duties and responsibilities
  3. Understand the basics of police operations
  4. Explain organizational and managerial concepts
  5. Explain the laws which govern them in the performance of their duties
  6. Explain the application process
  7. Discuss the liability issues and the effects of lawsuits on police officers and police agencies

 Criminal Law (Laws 1010)

 As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following: 

  1. Communicate effectively orally and in writing regarding legal matters
  2. Understand fundamental principles regarding the law and legal system of the United States
  3. Define how crimes are categorized by type and seriousness
  4. Identify how criminal law compares to other types of law
  5. Give an overview of the Constitutional limits on the power of government to regulate conduct

 Criminal Procedure (Laws 1020)  

 As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following:

  1. Identify various agencies encompassing the administration of justice and the inter-relationships between them.
  2. Identify crime problems, causal theories, criminal types, and the implications of crime statistics.
  3. Give an overview of the organization and operation of administration of justice agencies.
  4. Define the different terminology used in the field of administration of criminal justice.
  5. Analyze the legal liabilities and other consequences of police, prosecutorial, and judicial misconduct.
  6. Differentiate between the different criminal procedures before, during and after trial.

 

Criminalistics I (Laws 1030)

As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following: 

  1. Demonstrate the proper techniques of conducting a successful crime scene investigation.
  2. Explain the duties of the first officer at a crime scene.
  3. Prepare proper crime scene sketches in accordance with textbook and instructors methods.
  4. Prepare a “dental stone” casting of a shoe or tire impression.
  5. Explain the laws that guide criminal investigations, i.e., searches and seizures of persons and evidence.
  6. Explain trace evidence, its value, and demonstrate collection techniques.

 Criminalistics II (Laws 1040)

 As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following:

  1. Explain the history of the different identification techniques and the methods used in the fingerprinting process
  2. Demonstrate the different types of chemicals and equipment used to process a crime scene when searching for fingerprints and palm prints
  3. Use and explain the different types of classification/identification systems, i.e. Henry, (National Crime Information Center) NCIC, and (Automated Fingerprint Identification System) AFIS
  4. Explain and give situational examples of the use of forensic entomology in crime scene investigations
  5. Acquire a basic understanding of forensic pathology/terminology and the medical examiner’s office
  6. Acquire a basic understanding of forensic death investigation
  7. Calculate blood alcohol
  8. Acquire a basic understanding of firearms investigation and explosives

  Introduction to Paralegal Studies (Laws 1080)

As a result of taking this course, the student will be able to:

  1. …describe and explain the role of the legal profession in the United States
  2. …describe and explain the role of the paralegal profession as it presently exists
  3. …demonstrate a basic understanding of constitutional law as a foundation for Laws 2000 (Constitutional Law)
  4. …differentiate statutes and court decisions and also differentiate federal and state law sources
  5. …locate statutes and court decisions using an online legal research service

Constitutional Law Class (LAWS 2000)

As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following:

  1. Explain the history of the U.S. Constitution; the importance of the Constitution and the development and role of the United States Supreme Court.
  2. Explain and discuss the process of judicial interpretation of the Constitution and the impact of the philosophies of the individual justices on the courts decisions.
  3. Explain the legal terminology and concepts in the area of Constitutional Law.
  4. Identify and explain selected individual liberties as established by the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and other amendments.
  5. Explain and discuss historical decisions handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court and to further discuss contemporary issues facing the U.S. Supreme Court today.
  6. Demonstrate research and computer competency along with written communications skills through the completion of a paper analyzing the judicial philosophy of individual justices.

Law of Evidence Class (LAWS 2010)

As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following:

  1. ...demonstrate a working knowledge of the rules of evidence and the underlying rationale for each rule.
  2. ...analyze and apply the rules on the admissibility of evidence at trial and the role of the judiciary in both civil and criminal trials.
  3. ...compare and contrast the historical development of the rules of evidence and their effect on the modern rules of evidence.
  4. ...compare and contrast the Federal Rules of Evidence with the R.I. Rules of Evidence.
  5. ...develop critical thinking and improve verbal and written communication skills through the identification, interpretation, discussion and briefing (written summary) of a variety of evidentiary issues from actual criminal and civil court cases.

Basic Civil Procedure for Paralegals (Laws 2020)

As a result of taking this course, students will be able to:

  1. …differentiate substantive and procedural law and explain the inter-relationship between the two areas
  2. …define personal and subject matter jurisdiction involved in civil litigation matters
  3. …define the area of remedies in civil litigation matters
  4. …draft pleadings and discovery document in proper court format
  5. …explain the role of a paralegal in civil litigation matters

Criminal Law & the Constitution (LAWS 2030)

As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following:

  1. ...become familiar with and understand the legal terminology used in the area of constitutional criminal procedure.
  2. ...identify and understand the basic constitutional principles and the application thereof on all law enforcement officers’ activities in the investigation of crimes and the apprehension of criminals.
  3. ..understand the consequences of failure to meet constitutional standards in law enforcement activities.
  4. ...recognize the inter-relationship of federal and state constitutional and statutory provisions and case law.
  5. ...demonstrate both verbal and written communication skills through problem solving of actual criminal cases in the area of arrest, search and seizure.

Law and Society (LAWS 2040)

As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following:

  1. ...explain the relationship between the law and morality in connection with both society and the legal system.
  2. ...demonstrate critical thinking skills in learning to use the legal approach to problems solving with respect to leading social and legal issues our society faces including, but not limited to such topics as gun control, abortion, drugs, right to die and the death penalty.
  3. ...comprehend and develop an appreciation for both sides of the major social and legal issues addressed in this course along with balancing the interests of society and the rights of the individual.
  4. ...compete and collaborate with other students in defending either side of an argument on any issue related to law and society and lastly, to develop oral and written communication skills in the process.

Law of Contracts (Laws 2050)

As a result of taking this course, the student will be able to:

  1. …explain the legal terminology used in the area of contract law
  2. …apply the basic concepts of contract law to hypothetical situations
  3. …analyze consumer protection issues that surface in areas such as Identity Theft, Credit Cards, PayDay Loans, and Rent-to Own Centers
  4. …interpret the provisions of an existing contract of the student choosing using the essential elements of contract law

Law of Property, Estates, and Trusts (Laws 2060)

As a result of taking this course, the student will be able to:

  1. …distinguish real property, personal property, and fixtures
  2. …comprehend the legal terms and concepts in the areas of wills, trust, and probate
  3. …describe the process of administering a decedent’s estate
  4. …explain the various parts of a mortgage and the mortgage foreclosure process
  5. …identify the different types of powers of attorney and distinguish them from a living will

Law of Business Organizations (Laws 2070)

As a result of taking this course, the student will be able to:

  1. …describe the three different relationship that could be created under the law of agency
  2. …explain the various factors that go into the choice of a business form
  3. …distinguish general partnerships from limited partnerships and limited liability partnerships
  4. …compare and contrast limited liability companies, “S” corporations, and “C” corporations
  5. … be able to research employment law issues on the internet and government websites

Legal Research and Writing (Laws 2090)

As a result of taking this course, students will be able to:

  1. …effectively use the internet and online services for legal research purposes
  2. …research federal and state constitutions and statutes
  3. …research federal and state court decisions and regulations
  4. …write a law office memorandum that accurately and objectively reflect the results of a research project
  5. …brief a court decision to provide a summary of the case to a lawyer

Law of Torts (Laws 2100)

As a result of taking this course, the student will be able to:

  1. …identify and distinguish negligent, intentional, and strict liability torts
  2. …differentiate fault-based torts from vicarious and statutory liability torts
  3. …define the rules for products liability, premises liability, and emotional distress torts
  4. …analyze court decisions that set forth and change the law of torts
  5. …explain the defenses available in tort cases, especially assumption of the risk.

Case Studies in Criminal Law (Laws 2500)    

As a result of taking this course, students will be able to do the following

  1. Write clear, effective, and conventional English in the preparation of written assignments so that students will be capable of maintaining proper notes and written reports in the performance of their future jobs. 
  2. Apply critical thinking skills in the reading and interpretation of legal materials (statues, court decisions, etc.). 
  3. Understand the legal concepts and terminology in substantive areas of criminal law. 
  4. Have a basic knowledge of procedural rules and evidentiary rules and understand the relationship between procedural rules and substantive law. 
  5. Demonstrate a solid grasp of constitutional law principles as they relate to law enforcement, and in particular search and seizure law, the law on confessions, and the law on assistance of counsel. 
  6. Have a thorough knowledge of crime scene investigation and demonstrate knowledge of forensics by law enforcement agencies used in criminal investigations.

 


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Last Updated: 11/12/14