Community College of Rhode Island

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News Releases 2010

September

Gallery displays cultural book exchange project
Warwick, RI – Sept. 10, 2010: "West Meets East: A Cultural Book Exchange," a collaborative project showing approximately 20 books with 900 pages covered in drawings, writings and collages initiated by artist and former Community College of Rhode Island student Joanne Luongo, will be on display from Sept. 14 to Oct. 14 in the CCRI Knight Campus Art Gallery.
 
The exhibition features the work of students and faculty from the National University of Art in Bucharest, Romania; Worcester State College; Quinsigamond Community College; and The Massachusetts College of Art & Design. An opening reception for the exhibition will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 23, with an artist talk at 6 p.m. Refreshments will follow.
 
Luongo said her art "relies heavily on the engagement of various community groups and each one is different and quite unique. Of all my shared experiences, however, I believe the most fulfilling is the book exchange that I began in May of 2009 with an artist from Romania."
 
Luongo met Daniela Frumuseanu online and they became friends through their shared experiences as artists and educators. The idea of a handmade book that they could both work on together has blossomed into a cross-cultural visual arts community between artists in Romania and the United States. There are 20 books in circulation between these two countries with many more to follow.
 
As a result of the success of this collaboration, they have developed the "Cultural Book Exchange" between Romanian and American students. This project invites our students to participate in a book sharing project of their own. Any student who is involved in the arts is invited to participate and should contact Luongo by e-mail at Jo@papergirlsstudio.com.
 
After the exhibition at CCRI, the project will be presented at the National University of Art in Bucharest.
 
"The personal bond between all of us has formed a new community built of trust, understanding, appreciation and respect for our mutual and diverse cultures," Luongo said. "I believe that the free exchange of knowledge, ideas and inspiration between our cultures is the most important thing we have garnered from all of our efforts."
 
The gallery is located in Room 3500, on the third floor of the round building at the Warwick campus, 400 East Ave. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday. For more information, e-mail gallery director Viera Levitt at knightgallery@ccri.edu or call 401-825-2220.
 The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Public invited to view the night sky at CCRI
Warwick, RI – Sept. 10, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island will host a public open night from 7 to 11 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 22, at the Margaret Jacoby Observatory at the Knight Campus, 400 East Ave., Warwick.
 
Visitors will be able to look through the college’s 16-inch telescope as Assistant Professor Brendan Britton of the Physics Department leads a tour of points of interest in the night sky.
 
The observatory is located a short walk from the main building. The road leading to the observatory is the first right turn when approaching the main college building from the driveway. Parking is available in the short-term lot near the Enrollment Services entrance.
 
Cloudy or rainy skies will postpone the event. For scheduling information and updates, visit www.ccri.edu/physics/observatory.html. 
 
The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.


Paintings on display at Flanagan Campus gallery

Warwick, RI – Sept. 7, 2010: Paintings by Derek Leka are on display through Sept. 24 at the Community College of Rhode Island Flanagan Campus Gallery in Lincoln. A reception with the artist will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 14, and he will conduct an acrylic paint lecture and demonstration at 2 p.m. that day. Both events are free and open to the public.
 
Leka’s acrylic paintings on canvas explore electronics, microprocessors, architecture, nature, music, iconography and mythology. The paintings have a slow methodical movement and a logical progression.
 
About his work, Leka writes: "I use bright colors and hard-edged geometry generating both sparsely simple and dramatically complex images, involving squares, rectangles, stripes, gradations, overlaps, deep and shallow spaces, hard and soft contrasts, traditional and nontraditional harmonies, heat, electricity, movement, service and dependency. "
 
The gallery is located in Room 2420 on the first floor at CCRI’s Flanagan Campus, 1762 Louisquisset Pike, Lincoln. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. For information, e-mail tmorrissey@ccri.edu or contact Professor Thomas Morrissey, gallery director, at tmorrissey@ccri.edu.
 
The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.
 

August


See Perseids at Aug. 12 observatory open house

Warwick, RI – Aug. 6, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island’s Margaret M. Jacoby Observatory will be open from 8 to 11 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 12, so that visitors might observe some of the Perseid meteor shower. During its peak in the early morning hours, the rate of meteors reaches 60 or more per hour.

During open houses, visitors are given a constellation tour with Assistant Professor Brendan Britton of the Physics Department and learn how to identify points of interest in the night sky such as constellations, stars and sometimes planets that can be seen with the unaided eye. But the main attraction is the chance to look through the college’s research-grade 16-inch telescope at the surface of the moon, the rings of Saturn, star clusters, nebulae and other celestial bodies.

There is no admission fee. Cloudy or rainy skies will cancel the event; call 825-2212 or visit the CCRI Physics Department website at www.ccri.edu/physics/observatory.html for scheduled events at the observatory and weather cancellation information.

Gallery seeks art inspired by Knight Campus structure

Warwick, RI – June 21, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island’s Knight Campus Art Gallery director and curator, Viera Levitt, is seeking art work for a show and discussion titled "We Talk about Architecture, Architecture Talks Back" for the Spring 2011 semester. The inspiration for this show is the Knight Campus megastructure in Warwick, which was created in the Brutalist architectural style.

Any artist, architect or writer, as well as CCRI alumnus, faculty or staff member, is welcome to submit older artwork or create new video, photography, painting, drawing, object, sculpture, sound piece, dance, oral history, text or architectural model inspired by this building. Another open call closer to the exhibition date will include more information about the selection process; this is a preliminary call for works that would need more time to finish.

Brutalism is a style in modern architecture characterized by massive or monolithic forms, usually of poured raw concrete (béton brut) and typically unrelieved by exterior decoration. Buildings in this style are often suggestive of massive sculptures.

The flat-roofed concrete megastructure of the Knight Campus has a semicircular terminus and twin cylindrical skylight funnels, ranges in height from four to six stories and is set on a hilltop site. The building was designed by Perkins and Will Partnership of White Plains, N.Y., in conjunction with the Providence firms of Harkness and Geddes and Robinson Green Beretta.

A Rhode Island Historical Preservation Commission report called it "one of the most striking and innovative contemporary structures in the state" because of its prominent location visible also from routes 95 and 295. The report notes the design was strongly influenced "by the work of the famous modern architect Le Corbusier and has been reviewed extensively by international critics ..."

"Like it, love it or hate it, the Knight Campus of CCRI is truly a building in dialogue with its staff, students, visitors and with the people of Rhode Island. ‘We Talk about Architecture, Architecture Talks Back will be a chance to reflect and to ‘talk back,’" Levitt said.

For more information, or if you are not an artist but still want to participate, contact Levitt at VieraLevitt@gmail.com.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

July

Rehabilitative Health Department to host open house July 22

Warwick, RI – July 2, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island’s Rehabilitative Health Department will host an information session and open house from 5 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 22, at the college’s Newport County Campus, One John H. Chafee Blvd., Newport.

Attendees can learn about CCRI’s Physical Therapist Assistant, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Therapeutic Massage and Opticianry programs. The new flexible Therapeutic Massage associate degree program, the new competitive Therapeutic Massage certificate program and the online Opticianry program will be highlighted.

Campus tours will be conducted and attendees will have the chance to meet the faculty. Admissions officers will be available to answer questions and assist with registration and financial aid. Program directors also will be on hand for individual information sessions.

For more information about CCRI’s Rehabilitative Health programs, visit www.ccri.edu/rehabhealth or call 401-851-1672.

Orientation set for fall pharmacy tech program

Warwick, RI – July 2, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island will hold an orientation session for those interested in the college’s Comprehensive Pharmacy Technician program at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, July 14, in Room 4080 at the college’s Knight Campus in Warwick.

CCRI’s Center for Workforce and Community Education again will offer the 155-hour introductory program, which aims to quell the recent shortage of pharmacy technicians while giving future pharmacists a taste of the profession, beginning on Sept. 7.

Pharmacy technicians assist pharmacists, including filling, packaging and distributing medications as well as maintaining patient records and inventory. They work in retail pharmacies, hospitals and home health care pharmacies.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics, job opportunities for pharmacy technicians are expected to be good for full-time and part-time work, especially for those with certification or previous work experience. The technicians start earning about $10 to $15 an hour but certified technicians can earn 20 percent to 30 percent more.

Health care workers who want to enhance their knowledge of prescription drugs also can benefit from the program, which includes training in pharmacy math, generics, pharmacy law, insurance and interpreting prescriptions.
Contact Sue Caressimo at 825-2399 for more information about the program, to R.S.V.P. for an orientation session or to enroll.

June

CCRI brings Broadway to Warwick, Newport

Warwick, RI – June 17, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island will say "Hello Broadway!" this summer when students and professional performers put on a musical with seven performances on two campuses.

This is CCRI’s second performance of the musical, a revue of old and new show tunes and comedy skits with singing, dancing and acting reminiscent of old vaudeville or cabaret shows.

The show debuts on June 26 at the CCRI Knight Campus, 400 East Ave., Warwick, before moving to the Newport County Campus, One John H. Chafee Blvd., for shows on July 2 and 3. A second revue – the same cast performing different material – will run in Newport next month.

The first show is a tribute to Rhode Island native George M. Cohan, a Broadway and vaudeville playwright and songwriter famous for writing songs such as "You’re a Grand Old Flag" and "Give My Regards to Broadway." It also features original medleys of songs from "West Side Story." Show times are at 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 26, in the Bobby Hackett Theater in Warwick; and 8 p.m. on Friday, July 2, and 2 p.m. Saturday, July 3, in the auditorium in Newport.

The second show features music from the likes of Stephen Sondheim and Rogers & Hammerstein and works from musicals such as "Les Misérables," "Oklahoma!" "Rent," "Sweeney Todd" and others. It will be performed at 8 p.m. on Fridays, July 9 and 16, and at 2 p.m. on Saturdays, July 10 and 17, at the Newport campus.

CCRI Assistant Music Professor Dr. Audrey Kaiser of Warwick, producer and director of the show, has arranged the music of many familiar Broadway songs into medleys. "My idea is to keep a fabric going, and that’s why I arranged the medleys," she said. "It’s more interesting for the audience and for the cast."

The production’s cast consists mostly of 11 CCRI students and recent graduates who work with three professional performers serving as mentors. Kaiser said the large amount of material is meant to give the students as much experience as possible. "Every single person is able to do some sort of feature," she said.

Carol Lyon of Warwick, one of the cast’s professional members, has been in the theater business for 35 years. "Watching people with more experience than you is how you grow," she said, noting the student cast has been performing well. "This show is as professional-looking as you can get," she said.

One of those student performers is Mary Ellen Hurley of Little Compton, a 2010 graduate of CCRI who will attend Toronto’s prestigious and competitive Randolph Academy for the Performing Arts in September. "I love to perform, especially musicals like this," Hurley said. "This is a great opportunity to get some experience."

Hurley attended the Spindle City Ballet in Massachusetts and is trained as a soprano singer, pianist and violinist, but she did not have much stage experience before she participated in last year’s "Hello Broadway" production, which was much smaller in scope than this year’s show. "The only thing I did as far as performance was to be in the school talent show every year," she said.

Working on the CCRI production last summer helped her discover a love of theater, which she has chosen to pursue. "When I go to see a show, just watching [the performers], I feel like I can’t do anything else but that," she said.

Many other members of the cast are returning from last year’s production, among them Tyler Worcester of Woonsocket, a CCRI music performance major.

"I came back because I liked what we did last year in the show. We’re just like a big family," he said. "We’re all friends and we all get along … we’ve all come so far in such a short amount of time."

Kaiser said that while many summer productions at colleges charge students to participate, the cast of "Hello Broadway!" participates for free and spends more time rehearsing and performing.

Last year’s performance of "Hello Broadway!" was a fundraiser for the Deborah Y. Griffin Vocal Scholarship, and this year’s opening night also will raise money for the scholarship.

Kaiser said that donor support for this year’s show has allowed the program to grow in every respect from last year, with more singing and dancing to choreograph and rehearse. She said the cast is handling the extra material well. "This group has really come together as a solid, tightly woven machine," she said.

The wide range of material gives audiences a lot to choose from in selecting which show to attend, or a more varied experience if they see both revues.

Tickets to all shows cost $15 for adults or $10 for students and seniors. Reserved tickets are available by calling 401-825-2310, Ext. 2, or are available at the door.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI announces Spring 2010 dean’s list

Warwick, RI – June 8, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island announces that 1,123 students have been named to the dean’s list for the spring 2010 semester.

Students enrolled in a degree program who completed 12 credits this spring with a grade point average of 3.25 or higher with no grade lower than "C" are eligible for this scholastic honor.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Honorees are:
Rebecca Abt
Jael Acevedo
Sean Acker
Brenden Adams
Yorisola Ademoye
Samuel Adewumi
Rosa Aguiar
Jacqueline Ahern
Zvart Akchyan
Angela Albro
Athra Al-Fatlawi
Gabriel Alicea
Craig Alix
Joshua Allard
Kayla Allard
Ryan Allenson
Kimberly Allsup
Anna Almeida-Tenreiro
Jason Alton
Meixiang An
Ashley Andrade
Jessica Andrade
Christiana Andre
Antonio Andreoli
Lauren Andreoni
Amanda Andrews
James Angi
Felix Anstirman
Marc Antaya
Silvia Antigua
Alyse Antone
Natalia Araujo
Jessica Arnold
Nicholas Arnold
Raymond Arruda
Amy Asakli-DaSilva
Thomas Ascenio
Elizabeth Ashley
Carla Assalone
Joshua Asselin
Andrey Atamanchuk
Anthony Atella III
Kristen Aucoin
Mathew Aucoin
Laura Aussant
Holly Austin
Ashley Avelar
Anthony Avicolli .
Mohammad Awad
Brendan Baba
Lindsey Bailer
Alexander Bailey
Andrew Bairos
Jennifer Baker
Shannon Balko
Cheryl Balzano
Justine Banspach
Emanuel Baptista
Alicia Barata
Shannon Barbosa
Sarah Barchi
Mohammed Barlow
Lindsey Barnard
Mathew Barnes
Joshua Baron
Benjamin Barrett
Rachel Barrett
Eric Barron
Ahuva Barros
Brendan Barry
Nathan Bartlett
Tara Baynes
Deborah Beagan
Mathew Beatrice
Peter Beckwith
Andrew Belanger
Jennifer Belisle
Janet Bell
Ashley Bellis
Raymond Beltran
Jessica Benisch
Brittany Berard
Karen Berard
Eric Berardis
June Berdos
Justin Berendes
Louis Berger
Lynn Bergeron
Karen Bermudez
Steven Bernache Jr
Eva Bickford
Christine Bileau
Joshua Bissonnette
Joelle Bitar
Danya Black
Hilary Black
Melissa Blackmar
Michael Blais
Molly Blais
Bethany Blanchette
Jarrod Blanchette
Jonathan Blank
Amber Bliss
Britnee Bloschichak
Cory Blount
Harrison Boakye
Thomas Bobek jr
David Boissy
Charles Boisvert
Melissa Boisvert
Gleidy Bolivar
Brad Bolte
Galen Bomster
Briana Boragine
Kathy Bordeleau
Paul Botelho
Brittany Boudreau
Diane Boudreau
Breann Bouley
Christopher Bouvier
Bryan Bowes
Patrick Bowlby
Anthony Boyd
Andrew Boyer
Daniel Brach
Amanda-Lee Braddock
Charles Bradley
Nicole Branco
Todd Brault
Gregory Breard
Danielle Brennan
Kaelan Brennan
Judy Briggs
Regina Briggs
Meredith Brion
Jonathan Brisco
Susan Broccoli
Victoria Brockwell
Connor Broderick
Alexandra Brodeur
Joseph Brodeur
Sarah Brodeur
Rebecca Bronk
Allyson Brown
Ashley Brown
Dana Brown
Holly Brown
Melissa Brown
Monica Brown
Rachel Brown
Sebastian Brown
Kristen Brunelle
Mathew Buck
Randi Budlong
James Bun
Jessica Buono
Jessica Burdon
Kaitlyn Burke
Meredith Burkett
Georgiy Burkovskiy
Nicole Bush
Jesse Bussiere
K-Lee Butler
Donna Butterworth
Patrick Byrne
Ariel Cabral
Diana Cabral
Lauris Caceres
Briana Cahill
Cory Caldarone
Ryan Caldarone
Melanie Calderon
Sabrina Calderon
Michael Calise
Caitlin Callas
Courtney Camara
Jeremy Camire
Jaclyn Canario
Nicole Cann
Jacqueline Canola
Morgan Capalbo
Michael Cappelli
Christopher Carbone
Denisse Cardona
Wendy Cardona
Jeanne Cardoza
Michael Carleen
Robert Carley
Domenic Carnevale
Jeffrey Carpenter
Mathew Carpenter
Michael Carrasquillo
Kristina Carrero
Robert Carroll
Stuart Carter
Justin Carville
Katelyn Casale
Joshua Cascione
Devan Casey
Mathew Cass
Kevin Cassidy
Miguel Castillo
Michael Cavanagh
Gregory Caya
Julianna Cervelli
Kelly Chabot
Caitlyn Chalut
Robert Champagne
Christopher Champlin
Amber Charette
Steven Charria
Nicholas Chasse
Monica Chaudhary
Ying Chen
Michael Chenot
Kristen Chianese
Erica Chiappone
Rubina Chimnani
Christian Chirino
Stephanie Choiniere
Cori Christie
Allegra Christofaro
Waymund Chu
Cynthia Cicchillo
Andrea Cicerchia
Saadia Cicerone
Sofia Cifuentes
Nichole Cihat
Giovanni Cintolo
Jessiqua Claffey
David Clarkin
Mariela Clavijo
Alan Clayton
Jasmine Cleary
Cameron Cleveland
Kayla Cogean
Kathy Cole
Kerri Cole
Scott Cole
Derryck Coleman
Hollie Coleman
Krystal Coleman
Sarah Collard
Alexander Colon
Elianne Colon
Madeline Colson
Manuela Comire
Maria Consuegra
Raphael Conte
Allison Contillo
Miriam Contreras
Lindsay Coogan
Dempsey Cooper
Joseph Corcelli
Kevin Cordeiro
Ariana Corey
Emily Correia
Julie Correia
Samantha Corrigan
Audra Costa
Gilmar Costa
Jennifer Costa
Jose Costa
Michael Costa
Lia Costa-Pierce
Jason Cotnoir
Tricia Cotto
Patrick Cottrell
Kerrilynn Cotugno
Christopher Couepel
Roxanne Couto
Zelia Couto
Mathew Coyne
John Cranshaw
Mathew Craven
Michael Creamer
Andrew Croll
Hannah Crutchfield
Jean Cruz
Timothy Cureton
Genevieve Currier
Denis Daigle
Katie Dalpe
Kristen Daluz
Cheryl D'Amico
De'Rein Daniel
Akinola Daramola
Brandon D'Arezzo
Lori David
Aneliz De Jesus
Jose De Macedo
Lanee Deblois-Silva
Laurie DeCataldo
Lisa DeCesare
Christopher DeFazio
Angelo DeFeo
Kimberly DeFlaminio
Joseph Del Signore
Keivan Deleon
Nicholas Delfino
Maria Delgado Henriquez
Anthony DelGiudice
Colbie Dellagrotta
DonnaLee DellaGrotta
Allen Deloria
Kelly DelSanto
Peter Denomme
Michael Derderian
Yaredys DeRita
Christine DeRobbio
Cheltia DeSantis
Mark Deshaies
Sabrina Desjarlais
Sadie Devlin
Fatoumata Diallo
Michael Dias
Juan Diaz
Robert DiCristoforo
Christopher Didone
Christine Dietzel
Michael DiGiulio
Marc Dimartino
Moumy Diop
Rebecca DiPietro
David DiPilato
Michael DiQuinzio
Patricia DiRaimo
Kimberly DiRosario
Bryan DiSpirito
Eric Dittrich
Jennifer Dixon
Krystyna Djula
Debra Dobson
Michelle Dolbashian
Qi Dong
Danielle Donovan
Linda Donovan
Brian Doucette
Charles Dough
Michael D'Ovidio
Rachel Dow
Caitlin Doyle
John Doyle
Misty Drury
Brian Duchesne
Justin Duffer
Donnamarie Duffin
Ethan Dugas
Nathan Dumas
Mathew Dunton
Christopher Durand
Courtney Durocher
Anthony Dutra
Deanna Dyndur
Kristian Dzilenski
Tara Eastman
Elizabeth Edwards
Kathy Elkhoury
Brent Elliott
Alexander Elmayan
Ardem Elmayan
Hayley Emidy
Michael Erdahl
Alexandra Escolas
Sheri Ethier
Tiffany Ethier
Christopher Evans
James Ewig
Sharief Faid
Samantha Farias
Sammy Farland
Kelven Farnham
Jaclyn Farrar
Rachael Fashjian
Xu Feng
Crystal Fenner
Iris Ferguson
Sarah Ferguson
Anthony Fernandes
Kyle Fernandes
Meghan Fernandes
Alisa Ferraioli
Diana Ferrara
Brittany Ferreira
Shawn Ferreira
Tara Ferreira
Michael Ferrucci
Sarah Firth
Paris Fisher
Leah Fitzgerald
Lindsay Flamand
Catherine Flaxington
Jacqueline Flores
Cassandra Florez
Catherine Flynn
Jonathan Flynn
Lori Folan
Wing Fong
Dennis Fontaine Jr
Donna Fontenault
Alexandria Fontes
Julianne Forchione
Renee Ford
Thomas Ford
Heather Forthun
Brian Fortin
Ari Foster
Jessica Foster
Elizabeth Francisco
Alicia Franco
Kristina Franklin
John Fraunfelter
Nichole Frazier
Amanda Fredericksen
Cora Freelove
William Freeman Jr.
Kiley Freer
Melissa Fricot
Mathew Furia
Jessica Gabriele
Kathleen Gagne
Jamie Gagnon
Jean Gagnon
Lea Gagnon
Michelle Galano
Jeremy Gambardella
Scott Gamble
Leidy Garcia
Sebastian Garcia
Kendra Gardner
Mark Gardner
Jason Garland
Brittany Garneau
Julie Garosshen
Michael Garrepy
Ryan Garvey
Christina Gaudette
Heidi Gaudlap
Chelsea Gause
Kevin Geary
Kaela-Rose Gentile
Sydney Gentry
Caroline Gerbick
Sarah Gervasini
Christina Gianfrancesco
Vincent Gieck Jr.
Christopher Gilbert
Dennis Gilbert
Kayla Gilbert
Nicole Gilbert
Kevin Gilbride
Lucas Ginsberg
William Gionis
Alexa Gladstone
Philip Gleavey
Armando Gloria Jr.
Brandon Gmitra
Jill Godbout
Erin Godfrin
Corey Goffinet
Stephanie Gonsalves
Ingrid Gonzalez
Lucas Goodrich
Katherine Gordon
Rachael Gorman
Joshua Gorton
Dolson Gould
Sean Grace
Megan Gracia
Jhonatan Grajales
Gerard Grandpre
Jenna Grange
Karissa Grant
Robert Grant III
Kerra Grednuk
Harold Greene II
Elisabeth Gregoire
Robert Gregson
Karissa Greig
Jacob Gribbin
Marissa Groleau
Carolin Guerrero
Kayla Gulec
Diane Guli
Joshua Gustafson
Sarah Guthrie
Brenda Haarala
Ethan Hackett
Jack Hainsworth
Erin Hallene
Justin Hamel
Michele Hames
Stephen Hancsarik
Malia Hanna
Amanda Hannon
Carly Hanson
Christopher Hanson
Nathalie Harbin
Michael Hardy
Staci Harper
Marc Harriman
James Harrington
Linda Harrod
Amanda Hart
Mary Harty
Cody Haughton
Kelly Havican
Brian Hayes
Loralei Heater
Rebecca Hendricks
Jessica Henneberry
Margaret Mary Hennessey
Christopher Herbert
Felipe Hernandez Jr.
Eddy Herrera
Daniel Hewson
Angelique Higgins
Daniel Hill
Benjamin Hines
Laura Hirmas
Jessica Hirst
Rebecca Hockhousen
Danielle Holmes
Brent Hopkins
Daniel Hopkins
Brigette Houle
Dawn Houlihan
Amanda Howard
Albert Hulley
Wilaipun Hunley
Adriana Iannuzzi
Raul Iriarte
Linda Iribarren
Keshonn Jackson
Alcesta Jarrett
Jesse Jarvis
Stephanie Jaurigue
Sonalya Jayasuriya
Kaitlyn Jeffrey
Bing Jiang
Michelle Jodoin
Alexandra Johnson
Brianna Johnson
Carolyn Johnson
David Johnson
Kathleen Johnson
Shannon Johnson
Marcelito Jolito Jr.
Ashley Jones
Cathy Jones
Zachary Joslyn
Cassy Judd
Christopher Kamara
Charles Kamugisha
Ian Kaplan
Shannon Karpovitz
Stephen Keane
Laura Kearney
Sean Kearns
Kelly Keefer
Katherine Kelley
Gail Kelvey
Lisa Kemp
Kristin Kendall
Sean Kennelly
Douglas Key
Mathew Kiely
Katie Kilcommons
Nicole Kilroy
Chelsea Kinch
Lita King
Stacy Kirby
Yanick Koenig
Anita Kolsoi
Andrew Korkuc
Benjamin Kowalik
Maxwell Krieger
Karlia Kue
Maliya Kue
Heather Kumar
Kyle Kummer
Frank Kunc
Joshua Kutty
Charles LaBash Jr.
Nicholas Labrakis
Christopher Lacaille
Chelsea Lacasse
Ashley LaFerriere
Christy LaFerriere
Melissa LaForest
Marybeth Laiho
Claudia Lama
Rebecca Lambdin
Emily Lambert
Lisa Lambright
Cara Lampron
Andre Landry
Sabrina Landry
Amanda Lane
Kathryn Langley
Jeff Languirand
Dayna Laorenza
Shana Lapin
Pheakdey Laporte
Anthony Larsh
Mark Larson
Lindsey Laster
Marc Laurent
Amanda Lavallee
Diane Laxton
Andrew Laychak
James LeBeau
Deborah Lee
Justin Leite
Sara Lemme
David Lemoi
Mark Leonard
Zachary Leone
Alberonys Leotto
Breton Leshin
Steven Lessard Jr.
Jennifer Letourneau
Billy Lewis II.
Kristin Lewis
Ronald Lewis Jr.
Audrey Lietar
William Lightell
Maya Lincoln
Amanda Lister
Ashley Llewellyn
Ryan Lloyd
Paige Lobdell
Mackenzie Loffredo
Alexander Logan
Lindsay Loiselle
Leeann Lolio
Nicole Lombardo
Talia Lonardo
Biagio Longo
James Look
Yoadin Lorenzo-Ramirez
Alisa Loughlin
Mariela Lovegrove
Benjamin Lovejoy
Kristin Lowe
Christine Luettgens
Tara Lusignan
Nicole Lussier
Rokhaya Ly
Samantha Lyons
Jessica MacAndrew
Katy MacAndrew
Nicole MacDonald
Suzannah MacDonald
Christine MacIntosh
Keith Mackey
Brittany Macri
Angel Magee
Megan Maguire
Ali Mahjub
Mahri Mahoney
Elsch Maisoh
Johanna Malise
Melissa Malkasian
Zahra Malko
Patrick Malone
Jennifer Maloney
Linda Mambro
Louis Mancone IV
Jessica Mandeville
Jeffrey Mandler
James Manning
Zachary Mansuetti
Mitchell Manter
Taft Manzotti
Meagan Marchand
Kiera Marchesi
Katherine Marcil
Sean Marcotte
Jennifer Mariani
Edward Marotta
Joseph Marrapese
Adam Marshall
Joseph Marshall
Benjamin Marsland
Amber Martin
Christopher Martin
Danielle Martin
Shannon Martin
Donna Martinelli
Shanoi Martinez
Stephanie Martinez
Sulay Martinez
Edward Masoian
Joshua Mason
Beth Masse
Jessica Masso
Gregory Mata III
Roxanne Mathews
Kenneth Matuszek
Victoria Maxcy
Katelyn Maxwell
Kathleen May
Ryan May
Mackenzie Maynard
Shannon Maynard
Alexis McCabe
Katharine McCarten
Shannon McComiskey
Thomas McCormick
Meghan McCoy
Heather McCurdy
Jonathan McDowell
Ryan McGarry
Tracie McGetrick
Shamus McGovern
Jake McKay
Jarrod McKenney
Justin McKenney
Paige McLaughlin
Susan McLellan
Mark McLinden
Eric McNeil
Kayla McNeile
Theresa McNulty
Carissa Meekins
Ana Mejia
Yanahina Melgar
Mathew Mello
Alicia Melo
Tabitha Mendence
Nefris Mendez
Christopher Menihan
Adam Mercer
Patrick Merida
Ranny Meul
Ariana Meyer
Erin Micheletti
Sabin Mihigo
Linsey Millard
Alexandra Miller
Barbara Miller
Emily Miller
Emily Miller
Leah Miller
Melissa Miller
Arlene Millette
Brittany Modifica
Jonathan Molineaux
Nichole Molloy
Diana Moniz
Elizabeth Moniz
Linda Montgomery
Antonio Montilla
Michael Mooney
William Moore
Benjamin Morales
Joshua Morales
Michael Moran
Natasha Morena
Gustavo Moreno
Joseph Moretti
Felisa Morgado
Hannah Morrell
Stephanie Morse
Nicholas Mota
Tracey Moulton
Amanda Mowry
Danny Mulson
Stuart Mundy
Jacqueline Munoz
Katherine Muratori
Catherine Murby
Brian Murphy
Daniel Murphy
Susan Murphy
Jessica Murray
Tyler Murray
Jacobo Musali
Kelsey Muto
Amanda Nall
Amber Nardolillo
Casey Nardone
Carl Nassi
Daniel Nenart
Kanhnhar Ngeth
Triet Nguyen
Samantha Nicodemus
Amethys Nieves
Kyle Nordby
Bethany Northrop
Joram Northup
Jocelyn Nunes
Victoria O'Connor
Stephanie Octeau
Kimberly O'Donnell
Kathleen Ogni
Saidi Okanlawon
Olufunmilayo Ola-Wusu
Chelsea Orlando
Nicole Orlando
Cody Ortega
Ysamar Ortega
Luisa Ortiz
Ravy Ou
Randi-Lee Owens
Amanda Packer
Mazinho Palencia
Erika Palmateer
Andrew Palmer
Kristen Palmer
Julia Palmieri
Li-Hang Pan
Amanda Papineau
Cruz Paquin
Caitlin Pardee
Jennifer Pare
Amanda Parenteau
Sara Parks
Nicole Patriarca
Kerri Pattie
Jessica Paulo
Tomasz Pawlicki
Reed Pearsons
Samantha Pellerin
Elaine Peloquin
Samuel Peloquin
Stephanie Pemberton
Jamen Penney
Jessi Peralta
David Pereira
Tomas Perez
Wilson Perez Jr.
Haley Perkins
Tanisha Perona
Patricia Perry
Kaitlin Peters
Whitney Petranoff
Nicole Petrucci
Christina Pezza
Savannah Phillips
Jill Piana
Justin Picillo
Kayla Pickering
Jaime Pierce
Nolan Pierel
Meghan Pilkington
Brandon Pilmer
Geraldine Pimentel
Robert Pinheiro
Nichole Pinto
Amy Planeta
Amy Plante
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Justin Pomfret
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Joseph Portukalian
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Marly Proeun
Danielle Proulx
Richard Proulx Jr.
Julio Pruenca IV
Ynocencio Pujols
Kristin Purvis
Elena Pyataeva
Justin Quinn
James Radcliffe III
Sogand Raissi
Kellie Randall
Patricia Randall
Robert Rannin
Devara Rao
Rubab Rashid
Sarah Ray
Richard Read
Jonathan Recasino
Andrew Recine
Linda Regan
Andrew Reilly
Michael Reinhart
Anthony Reis
Sarah Reiter
Rebecca Remillard
Steve Resch
Gerardo Reyes
Nelsy Reyes
Andrew Rhodes
Lisa Rhodes
Nicole Ricci
Thomas Ricci
Tori Ricci
Glen Rich
Maxwell Richmond
Meaghan Richmond
Jenna Riddensdale
Jaden Riendeau
William Rietzel III
Gordon Riley
Nicole Riley
Jonathan Rinn
Erika Ritacco
Frances Rivard
Connie Rivet
Bridget Roberts
Carrie Roberts
Karen Roberts
Michael Roderick
Gregory Rodger
Elizabeth Rodi
Eliana Rodriguez
Teresa Rodriguez
Jane Roggero
Luz Roman
Erin Romance
Amanda Roque
James Rose III
Nick Rossi
Travis Rossi
Rebecca Rossiter
Julianne Rotondo
Troy Rotondo
Aimee Rousseau
Breanna Rousseau
Nicholas Rowe
Steven Rubery
Brittany Ruggiero
Tathiani Ruzzo
Shannon Ryan
Brendan Ryan-Buchanan
James Rzepecki
Jeannette Saccoccio
Michael Saccoccio
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Daniel Saltzman
Amy Salvo
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Bhavya Sangars
John Sansone
Jane Santamaria
Lucia Santilli
Siham Saouib
Stephen Saranteas
Joseph Saunders
Steven Savitt
Oliver Scampoli
Ryan Scanlon
Alex Schneider
Carissa Schneider
Noah Schneider
Jessica Schofield
Jessica Scholz
Brittney Schuessler
Hannah Schuster
Kellie Schwartz
Alfred Scivola
Amber Scoufos
Tara Seabaugh
Kara Seccareccia
Nelida Semedo
Kaoutar Semmah
Laura Senerchia
Angie Serpas
Christina Seth
Heather Shaffer
Michael Shaw
Virginia Shaw
Courtney Shea
Michaela Sheehan
Douglas Shehan
Meggan Shenefield
Tyler Sherry
Joseph Silva
Abilyn Silvia
Lori Silvia
Peter Simeone II
Eleftherios Simijis
Mathew Simon
Adam Simonelli
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Phouphokham Sisomboun
Kunthea Siv
Justine Slade
Andrea Slader
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Lisa Slocumb
Amie Smith
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Nicole Smith
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Blair St. Onge
Michelle St.Onge
Emily Stamp
William Stang IV
Gina Stangel
Elizabeth Steck
James Stedman
Zoe Steele
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Andrea Sterling
Michael Stevens III
Benjamin Stiles
Max Still
Gwyneth Stovall
Henry Stracensky
Lauren Strycula
Stephen Studley
Norman Suarez
Justin Sularz
Mary Sullivan
Elizabeth Sundaram
Jonathan Sundquist
Tyler Sutcliffe
Jennifer Sutton
Miranda Sweetloice
Keith Swiech
Julia Szumita
Lukasz Szymoniak
Milosz Szymoniak
Charmian Talbot
Oona Tart
Danielle Tedesco
Stacey Tenbrink
Sudhakararao Thammana
Jamie Thibault
Travis Thibodeau
Thomas Thompson
James Thomson
Shaun Thurber
Megan Topp
Caitlin Torpey
Josimar Torres Borgos
Kristof Toth
Eric Tracy
Justin Trainor
Stephen Trank
Christopher Travis
Stephen Trinkwald
Elaine Trujillo
Marisa Tudino
Victoria Tyler
Gregery Unger
Erika Valencia
Ryan Vanderweit
Kenira Varela
Raul Vargas
German Vargas-Aguirre
Lisa Vaudrain
Daniel Velasquez
Daniel Vellucci Jr.
Jeffrey Venticinque
Emile Vermette III
Erica Vespia-Cronin
Gianna Vessella
Sonia Vetelino
William Vickers
Alycia Viens
Andre Vierra
Tori Villella
Marc Vincelette
Pete Vincent Jr.
Kyle Vinton
Tara Vossler
Megan Wagner
Jessica Wainfor
Sharon Walker
Patrick Walsh
Alyssa Ward
Angel Washington
Blaine Waterman
Brittany Waterman
Dean Waterman
Kimberly Waterman
Kimberly Waterman
Mary Waterman
Mathew Wehrheim
Angelica Werner
Charles West
Hannah Wheeler
Susan Wheeler
William Wieters
Shane Wilcox
Sharon Wilkinson
Christian Williams
Heather Willis
Leslie Willis
Breanne Wilson
Jenifer Wilson
Jordan Wilson
Jory Wilson
Ronald Wilson
Alphrosine Wisher
Mathew Wnuk
Michael Wolfe
Josh Woodard
Gabriel Wroblewski
Samuel Wroblewski
Courtney Wyatt
George Xiong
Kalia Yang
Candice Yi
Peter Young II
Mikalai Zhukavets
Jaymi Zoglio

May

Veteran named CCRI student speaker

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Growing up in one of New York City’s worst neighborhoods, Leonardo Sime, Class of 2010 student commencement speaker and U.S. Marine Corps veteran, found escape in two things: education and service.

Sime, 38, plans to combine these two virtues by becoming a teacher in hopes that his life experience will be useful to his students.

Sime was raised in New York’s lower East Side during the 1980s, witnessing gang violence and the city’s devastating crack epidemic just outside his door. He lived modestly with his mother and four sisters. "Our mother worked hard and raised us on a meager salary," Sime said.

To stay out of trouble, and to insulate himself from the chaos and violence on the streets, Sime raised pigeons on the roof of his building and worked diligently in school. "School was my sanctuary; it was my home away from home," he said.

Education ultimately would prove to be his path, but first Sime wanted to get out of New York City, which he did by enlisting in the Marines in 1990.

"When I was a kid I used to watch movies with my mom that portrayed soldiers heroically and I said, ‘I want to do that when I grow up,’" he said.

Sime served in the Persian Gulf and left the military in 1994, returning to New York and attending The Borough of Manhattan Community College. His first attempt at higher education did not last. "There are a lot of distractions in the city and I couldn’t concentrate," he said.

It is much easier for someone without a college degree to find work in a metropolitan area, Sime said, and he spent time working as a personal trainer and doing other jobs, putting his education on hold.

Sime again felt compelled to serve his country after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. He learned to speak Arabic and re-enlisted in the Marines, serving in Iraq until 2004.

It wasn’t long after he returned that Sime’s sisters, who had moved to Providence, persuaded him to join them in Rhode Island.

After New York, Providence seems small to Sime, and he joked that the relative quiet of the city makes it hard for him to sleep given the noise he is used to. However, this also provided a great environment for studying, and Sime began taking classes at CCRI in Fall 2007.

"Ever since I started school here I haven’t had as many distractions," he said. "It has been a very eventful, challenging experience and I loved every minute of it."

Sime married his wife, Nelida, in March 2007 and he juggled his academic responsibilities with raising three stepchildren and two of his own. On top of this, Sime is a personal trainer, volunteers with his church and works with behaviorally troubled children in the Providence public school system. "Doing all of those plus school has been very challenging, but I made it," he said.

Sime more than just "made it"; he graduated with a degree in General Studies as a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society with a 3.7 GPA. He hopes to go on to earn a bachelor’s degree in English so that he can teach writing, one of his passions.

"I like the art form of creating pictures through words," he said, adding, "I enjoy the reciprocal relationship between a reader and a writer."

He hopes to teach secondary education and then become a college professor and believes that in both cases his life experience and military service will help him bring a unique perspective to his students.

"I’ve always felt that life experience and education would help me help my community," he said.

Sime recently turned down admission to Columbia University, not wanting to return to New York and also hoping to be admitted to Brown University, but he was unfortunately denied. "A lot of people would look at that [rejection] letter as negative, but I take it as inspiration to aspire to even greater heights," Sime said.

He is now considering finishing his bachelor’s degree at the University of Rhode Island, which he can do right in his new home of Providence.

"Think of it as swimmers in a pool," he said. "If you focus on the negative, you’re treading water while everyone else is doing laps. If you focus on the negative, that’s where you’ll be stuck."

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI graduate to study restaurant management

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Until a few years ago, an education didn’t seem very important to Shane Oliver. The San Diego native dropped out of high school during his sophomore year in 1983, feeling alienated from the educational system.

"I was not your traditional student. I didn’t fit in," he said. "It was very uncomfortable and I wasn’t doing well."

Oliver started working as a dishwasher at a local restaurant to support himself. He was at the very bottom rung of the professional ladder in the hierarchical food service world, but over the next 20 years, he reached considerable heights.

"I worked my way up from dishwasher to general manager and I’ve done every aspect in between, from cooking to administration," Oliver said.

He moved to Manhattan in 1990 after visiting a friend there and worked at many bars and restaurants in what he considers the food capital of America.

Though he enjoyed the city, Oliver dreamed of opening his own restaurant and was beginning to get the sense that he had gone as far as he could go without an education. When he moved to Newport in 2005 to work in the restaurants there, he found himself living just down the street from the Community College of Rhode Island’s Newport County Campus.

"I wasn’t sure if I wanted to get a degree or if I just wanted to take a couple of classes to check it out," Oliver said, "but the campus was right up the street from my house and it looked kind of cool, so I went there out of curiosity."

Oliver, 42, of Newport, met with CCRI advisers who strongly suggested that he earn a GED, which he received from the Aquidneck Island Adult Learning Center in 2005.

"I didn’t really like the idea, but I went and one thing led to another," Oliver said. "Having accomplished that was invigorating, so after that I came back for more. That was the beginning of where I am today."

Fluent in Spanish, Oliver enrolled at CCRI in 2006 hoping to join the Bilingual Judicial Interpreter program because it involved a skill he already possessed. When that program was full, he returned to his original idea of opening a restaurant or a bed-and-breakfast.

"I’m just a host at heart," Oliver said. "I like food and I like entertaining."

After being away from school for so long, Oliver had a difficult start at the college.

"When I finally entered CCRI, I had to take several remedial courses in math and reading because I had no familiarity with any of that stuff," Oliver said. "I thought that I was the only person who had this sort of story but it turns out that a lot of students who go to CCRI have to take remedial math and English courses."

Oliver credited the tutors at the Success Center with helping him through his initial difficulties. "It’s been very challenging at times but the motto here is ‘changing lives’ and that’s definitely what [the college] has done for me," Oliver said.

Oliver worked as a bartender while putting himself through CCRI, sometimes taking courses twice to maintain his 3.6 GPA. As the semesters rolled by, his attitude toward education began to change.

"At first I was just here to get things done and move on," Oliver said, "but then it became more about absorbing the lessons and applying them to life to be successful."

Oliver, the first person in his family to attend college, graduated with a degree in General Business. He has been accepted to study restaurant management at Johnson & Wales University, the last step toward his entrepreneurial goal.

After, he plans to open his own business in either his native California or right here in Rhode Island.

"I want to open something that is affordable and a good value," Oliver said. "This is a great place to open a restaurant or a bed-and-breakfast."

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI graduate finds calling to nursing

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Bernard McDonnell already holds a master’s degree, but it has taken the 2010 nursing graduate of the Community College of Rhode Island almost 30 years to find his true calling.

"My life has never gone according to what I thought it would," McDonnell said.

McDonnell, 50, of North Providence grew up in an Irish Catholic family outside of Boston that valued faith and education. He entered the seminary at Stonehill College at age 18 to study to enter the priesthood, but decided that the lonely clerical life was not for him.

"You discern whether God is actually calling you," McDonnell said. "You either have the calling or you don’t, and I don’t think I did."

Still enjoying the academic environment, McDonnell enrolled at St. John’s Seminary in Boston and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy in 1982. "I got a degree right on schedule at age 22 and promptly didn’t know what do with it," he said.

McDonnell’s father suggested that he become an electrician to make money, and he became an electrical apprentice and then a licensed electrician. At night, he took courses at UMASS Boston in psychology, music, literature and history, simply to satiate his curiosity.

"I’ve always been better with abstract reality than the reality," McDonnell said about his academic pursuits. "I think there’s a thread in me that’s always been a little restless. I wouldn’t say I’m an intelligent guy. I’m a curious guy."

By 1994, McDonnell turned these night classes into a bachelor’s and then a master’s degree in literature, but he again could not find work with his academic qualifications and continued working as an electrician, running his own business from 1994 until 1998.

A slowing economy made jobs for electricians scarce and, in 1998, McDonnell became an English teacher in the Massachusetts public school system and correctional system.

He took a break from teaching in 2001 but in 2003, a former colleague, now a principal at North Attleboro High School, invited him to teach there to fill a vacancy. He found much more than a job.

"I did not have any intention of getting married but I go over there, and don’t I meet my wife!" McDonnell said.

He married a fellow teacher at the school, Helene Cosme, in 2005 and the couple moved to Providence. Around this time, McDonnell began to tire with teaching, having what he called "a midlife crisis that was positive."

He took some time off to think about what he wanted to do next. McDonnell’s sister suggested that he consider nursing as a way to help others. A cancer survivor, she convinced McDonnell that the only purpose in life is to give love and be loved, and that he could offer comfort to others.

"The last thing I ever thought was that I would be a nurse," McDonnell said. "But you can find out where there is a need and go there and do the work."

McDonnell enrolled at CCRI in Fall 2006 to study nursing, forgoing a four-year school despite his academic qualifications. He graduated with a 3.25 GPA.

"People said, ‘Why don’t you go to a four-year institution when you have these advanced degrees?’" McDonnell said. "And I told them, ‘Because I think [CCRI is] a good school.’"

After four degrees and two careers, McDonnell believes he has found his path. "[Nursing] is a profession that slaps you in the face with what’s important in this world and what isn’t," he said.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Senegal native to continue business education

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Before she attended the Community College of Rhode Island, Mame Marye Mbaye, 24, of Providence had never taken a course in English.

The 2010 CCRI graduate moved to the United States from Senegal with her family in July 2007 so that she could receive a better education.

"My family values education very much," Mbaye said. "Everything that my parents have in this life, no one gave it to them, they had to work for it."

Both of Mbaye’s parents were educated in the United States and they wanted that same opportunity for their daughter, who enrolled at CCRI in Fall 2008.

"When I came over here, I met a friend who graduated from CCRI. She said at CCRI you can get your degree and it’s very affordable," Mbaye said.

Mbaye’s limited English made school more challenging for her. "I thought, ‘I will speak the language and I don’t care about the mistakes I’m going to make, the only way to learn is by speaking with someone,’" she said. "It was very hard for me to adapt and cope with this American society knowing little English."

Nonetheless, Mbaye persevered. "CCRI is a great school and if you have the dedication and determination, you will succeed," she said.

Mbaye had taken college economics courses in Senegal, but none of those credits could be transferred to CCRI and she had to begin her General Business degree all over again.

She took classes full time and, although her family did not expect her to work, Mbaye took on extra responsibilities including a full-time shift at a factory in Woonsocket.

"I knew that I could go to work like my peers do," Mbaye said. "They go to work, go to school and succeed at the same time, and that inspired me."

Mbaye had a second job on campus tutoring fellow students in her native French, which she speaks along with Portuguese and Wolof, Senegal’s most common language.

She was also president of the CCRI International Club and led trips to Cambodia, Korea and Thailand during her tenure.

"I like to be involved in school activities," Mbaye said. "There’s some students who only know the parking lot and the classroom, but that’s not for me."

On top of these responsibilities, Mbaye assumed care of her younger sister when their parents had to return to Senegal this summer. Mbaye’s father is diabetic and lacks medical insurance in the United States, so he must return to Senegal frequently for treatment. Mbaye is planning to visit him there this summer.

Now that she is a CCRI graduate, Mbaye wants to continue in the world of higher education that she came to America to be a part of.

She has applied to Bryant University and Rhode Island College for finance.

"I plan to get experience with a company and then afterwards open my own business," she said, something she never could have done without a college degree.

"I think education is a sleeping pill that makes dreams happen," Mbaye said.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI graduate will study in Japan

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: In some ways, it took a serious accident to set Zachary Mansuetti’s life on course.

After failing two classes during his first semester at the Community College of Rhode Island in 2007, Mansuetti stayed awake all night studying for a math test during the June 2008 summer session. He thinks his fatigue contributed to what happened next, as he drove to campus from his home in West Greenwich.

"Somehow I landed on [Route] 95 south instead of 95 north and I don’t remember much after that," he said.

An 18-wheeler struck Mansuetti’s driver-side door, leaving him grievously hurt. He suffered a collapsed lung, fractured pelvis and lower vertebrae, a cut wrist and brain injuries that sent him into a seizure.

"[The doctors] weren’t sure if I was going to make it," Mansuetti said. "I had two emergency surgeries and once my lung was re-inflated they knew I would be OK, but they didn’t know what state I would be in. They told my parents there was a distinct possibility I would be a vegetable."

Mansuetti spent two weeks in a medically induced coma. He had vivid dreams that he had succeeded at each of his possible life goals: becoming an actor or a scholar of the Japanese language.

After Mansuetti woke up, these goals had to be put on hold. His doctors’ worst fears had not come to pass, but Mansuetti remained in the hospital for three more weeks and missed the Fall 2008 semester while he recovered in intensive physical therapy. Complications from his collapsed lung gave him many respiratory infections and two bouts of pneumonia.

When Mansuetti returned to school in Spring 2009, he was determined to be the best student he could.

"I always planned on coming back as soon as I could," Mansuetti said. "After my accident I wanted to make sure I wet my feet in everything I potentially could be doing."

Mansuetti redoubled his academic efforts and graduated with a General Studies degree and a 3.89 GPA. He was the stage manager of a CCRI drama production, wrote for the Unfiltered Lens student newspaper and took Japanese courses at the college and at the University of Rhode Island.

Mansuetti continued to undergo a physical change as well. At one time weighing almost 300 pounds, he continued the fitness program he had started before his accident and is now much healthier and 100 pounds lighter.

As busy as he was, Mansuetti was still unsure which of his interests to follow as a career path, but a chance encounter finally helped him decide.

Mansuetti took a trip to New York City to see Japanese pop star Utada Hikaru, one of Japan’s biggest stars who is known simply as Utada in the United States. He won a raffle to get up on stage to meet the singer, a moment that ended his internal debate.

"I got to actually meet somebody who sells out stadiums in Japan," Mansuetti said. "And once that happened I took it as a sign that I was supposed to go with [studying] Japanese. Life was really pointing me in that direction."

This decision came after a lifetime of interest in Japanese language and culture, starting when Mansuetti was in the fifth grade and became captivated by the Pokemon craze.

He decided he wanted to watch Pokemon cartoons in the original Japanese and ordered VHS tapes direct from Japan.

"Although I couldn’t understand what they were saying in the tapes, I fell in love with the way it sounded and how they pronounce the words," Mansuetti said.

Mansuetti, 21, soon will turn his lifelong love of the language into a career. He has been accepted to Temple University of Japan in Tokyo, the only school that is recognized by both Japan and the United States, meaning he will technically have a degree from both countries.

Upon graduation, he hopes to work as a translator for the U.S. government, perhaps even for the United Nations.

"I would consider that to be my lifelong dream. I always had it in the back of my head but I never followed through that it was the one thing I wanted to do," Mansuetti said.

"My time at CCRI was a time that I will never forget and I will always remain very thankful," he added. "My gratitude is always with me for what they offered me, and I’m excited to take the next step and go to Tokyo."

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Caregiver fulfills goal to graduate from college

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Jean Lamb of Cranston gave up a good career to take care of a sick family member, and in doing so found a new calling.

Lamb, 50, worked for 30 years in corporate and academic arenas and nonprofit sectors, jobs that were as fulfilling as lucrative, but in June 2007, she resigned to devote her time to caring for her elderly aunt.

Lamb’s father died suddenly in 2007 and her mother died 15 years earlier. This affected her decision to become a caregiver. "I never had the opportunity to care for my mom or dad in their later years, and that’s something we’re supposed to do," she said.

"My aunt was very, very sick and she was pleading with me to get someone to help her," Lamb said. "I just felt it in my heart that I needed to take care of my aunt."

Lamb planned to return to work eventually but she could not find a new job in this bad economy. "I figured, ‘I have 30-plus years of experience, I can get a job,’" she said. "But I couldn’t find one."

Touched by her experience with her aunt, Lamb decided to enroll at the Community College of Rhode Island in human services with a concentration in gerontology, the study of aging and the elderly.

She began taking classes in the Spring 2008 semester while working part time as a waitress and caregiver. Lamb temporarily found herself a double caregiver when her husband needed emergency abdominal surgery during her first semester. He has had five operations since then and had to give up his job as a carpenter.

Lamb took care of her husband, her aunt and managed a household including her two children and three stepchildren while attending classes and maintaining a 3.87 grade point average. At one point or another, Lamb and all of her children were all enrolled at CCRI together.

Lamb’s husband, unable to return to his old job, recently enrolled at CCRI and will begin classes in the fall.

Lamb, a Human Services major, graduated from CCRI as a member of the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society and the Psi Beta Honor Society for Psychology. She also is an Honors Program graduate and received several awards and scholarships.

She has been accepted to URI to continue her study of gerontology and eventually wants to earn a master’s degree in public administration to develop and implement policies and programs for the elderly.

Lamb’s educational success represents the fruition of a dream she has had for most of her life.

When she graduated from St. Xavier’s Academy in 1978, she immediately wanted to go to URI to become a teacher but decided to spend one year working to raise money for her tuition. In the meantime she found steady employment, got married and raised a family. "That one year turned into me finally getting my degree 30 years later," Lamb said.

She credits CCRI with much of her success. "CCRI has been the bedrock of why I have been this successful," she said. "Everyone at the college wants you to succeed. Failure is not something they want for you, as long as you give back. It’s a very reciprocal environment."

She added that she is excited to be a CCRI alumna and happy to have completed one of her lifelong goals.

"I’ve traveled to Europe, I raised my kids, I bought my own home, but this is something I’ve always wanted to do," she said.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Graduate’s life transformed at CCRI

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Literature has always been a passion and an escape for Phillip Johnston, 22, and he hopes it soon will be a career as well.

The 2010 Community College of Rhode Island General Studies graduate grew up in Providence’s inner city, where his mother struggled to make ends meet.

"There were times when we didn’t know how we were going to pay the bills," Johnston said, "There were times when the lights got shut off, but she tried really hard and did a good job."

Reading was always a sanctuary for Johnston, and he began to write his own stories.

"When times got really tough I ran to my imagination," he said. "Writing and creating characters has always been a hobby of mine. The fact that all the great stories you hear are all from someone’s ideas and imagination gives me a very special feeling."

Johnston never knew his father and was raised by a patchwork of individuals, he said, from his mother and aunt to cousins and teachers. "I was lucky enough to have good people around me, keeping me on the good path," he said. "I owe all my success to them."

When Johnston graduated from Central High School in 2005, he knew he wanted to continue his education in some way, but wasn’t sure exactly what to study or where to go. "I knew that I loved being at school and I loved learning new things, but I wasn’t sure where the money was going to come from," he said.

Several people recommended CCRI to Johnston as a place where he could stay in the academic environment he loved for an affordable price, a place where "you don’t have to play the hand you’re dealt.

"I heard that CCRI was a hub for those students who are looking for themselves … it turned out to be that and so much more," Johnston said.

He enrolled at the college in Fall 2005 and worked at the Liston Campus Information Technology Department as a work-study job, but he sometimes still had trouble paying bills.

The last time the lights and gas were shut off in his home was in the fall of 2008, while he was taking three classes. He slept on friends’ floors whenever possible and, when he was at home, took a cold shower in the dark before going to school.

"I had to go to class with my game-face on," Johnston said. "People expected things of me and I was going to deliver."

These people included many of CCRI’s teachers and staffers: Assistant English and Drama Professor Theodore Clement; Associate English Professor Laurie Sherman and the rest of faculty of the Liston Campus English department; Stephanie M. Cruz, the associate director of Educational Opportunity Center, a federally funded TRIO program; Liston Campus Interim Director Walter Crocker; and Dolly Quigley of the Liston IT Department.

Johnston’s professors also encouraged him to embrace his interest in literature. He plans to stay in school to earn a master’s degree and eventually a doctorate in English literature so that he can be a college professor. He may even want to return to teach at CCRI someday. "It would be very special to come back to this place that way," he said.

Johnston has been accepted to Rhode Island College and Providence College and is working out each school’s financial aid offerings before making a final choice. He said he hopes to remain living in Providence, where the city’s artistic environment reminds him of the Harlem Renaissance, his favorite literary period.

He said he will always remember the start he got at CCRI. "It definitely changed my life coming here, like it does for all graduates," he said. "When people come to CCRI, they leave here and they’re transformed."

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI graduate fled violence in Colombia

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Raúl Iriarte’s country has been at war for more than 40 years, and the only way for him to escape the violence was to flee.

Growing up in Medellín, Colombia, Iriarte had known only a country at war, with several different factions of guerrilla soldiers constantly fighting the government and one another and even holding sway over some areas.

Iriarte’s father worked for the Colombian government, making him and his family a target of the anti-government guerrillas who frequently threatened violence. Worse, guerillas who demanded a tax from the entire town invaded and occupied Iriarte’s grandparents’ profitable farmland.

After his 18th birthday in 2005, Iriarte was about to be drafted into the Colombian military to fight a war he did not believe in. "All of the factions are equally bad, even the government one," he said.

The only way to avoid military service in Colombia, which is mandatory for all young men, is to pay a large fee. With Iriarte’s family in turmoil at the time, no one could afford it. Not believing in the violence around him, Iriarte failed to report to the army and thereby made himself a fugitive. "It was only a matter of time before they came to get me to send me to jail," he said.

Iriarte’s only option was to flee the country as soon as possible. He considered crossing the border to Ecuador but decided to use his United States visa, which he had from spending a year living in Boston while his father worked as a diplomat. His mother’s cousin lives in Rhode Island and agreed to receive him but, as someone wanted by the Colombian government, Iriarte was taking a chance by boarding an international flight.

Nevertheless, he went to the airport with his grandmother. "I knew it was the last time I would see her," he said. "I would either make it and not be able to come back or get caught and end up in jail."

The trip to the United States was nerve-wracking. "I remember that day very well," Iriarte said. "I showed up at the airport and waited in line. The woman at customs opened my passport and stamped it. If she had scanned it, I would have been detained right there."

Iriarte’s flight to Providence had a stopover in Miami and, when the plane was close to landing, he had to fill out a customs form.

The reason for his visit? Pleasure. Where would he be staying? Iriarte did not have his relative’s address, so he claimed he would be staying at the Hyatt Hotel in Miami, taking the address from an in-flight magazine. How much money did he have? Iriarte reported $2,000, a realistic amount for a vacation abroad. In truth, he had $8 in his pocket.

Landing in Miami, Iriarte was again in danger that the true nature of his visit would be discovered and he would be deported immediately. "Nobody checked that I had a connecting flight to Providence 20 minutes later," he said. "I guess I was very lucky. I was meant to be here."

Iriarte applied for political asylum in the United States as soon as he arrived in Rhode Island, touching off a three-year court battle. "It took a long time and it was very, very scary," he said.

If this bid failed, Iriarte would be returned to Colombia to face jail time and likely military service in the country’s most dangerous area as punishment for having fled.

Helping Iriarte with his legal battle was Allison Foley, a lawyer fresh out of Roger Williams University and working her first independent case.

Foley won the case in three years – which Iriarte was told is an amazingly short time for an asylum proceeding – giving him full residency and eligibility for citizenship in 2012. "It was a really big victory for her," Iriarte said. The two remain close friends.

Through another lucky meeting, Iriarte found love and a chance to continue his education. After only a week in the United States, Iriarte met Josh Klemp, who has been his partner for five years. Klemp is the director of SkillsUSA, an organization that has an office at the Community College of Rhode Island, and he suggested that Iriarte attend classes at the college.

Iriarte, a Providence resident, began taking classes in 2007, before his asylum status was granted. "I wanted to get something started," Iriarte said. "I always knew what I wanted to do."

After graduating with a degree in General Studies and a 3.8 GPA, Iriarte will go on to Rhode Island College to study to become a Spanish teacher.

"Spanish is my passion; all the Latin languages, but especially Spanish," Iriarte said. "I think I want to share that."

Wherever he goes from here, Iriarte said he will always remember CCRI. "I will never forget where I started," he said. "CCRI gave me a chance to start everything and it will always be my school."

Though he can never again return to Colombia, many of Iriarte’s relatives also have fled the turmoil there and live in Argentina, France and Miami. Iriarte and Klemp are planning their first trip abroad together this summer to Spain.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI graduate wants to help native Haiti

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: To Ornessa Hyppolite, it felt like the end of the world.

The Community College of Rhode Island student was with her mother, visiting family in their native Port-au-Prince, Haiti, when the country was hit by a devastating earthquake in January 2010.

Hyppolite, 26, of Woonsocket, was stranded in Haiti for a month. She and her mother have lived in the United States since 2005 but have only residency and not citizenship yet, meaning that the U.S. government evacuated many others before them. While they waited, mother and daughter were firsthand witnesses to one of the worst catastrophes of the 21st century.

"It was hard for me and my mother. We stayed without food for a couple of days and slept on the streets, something I’ve never done in my life," Hyppolite said. "It touched me a lot. I see life very differently now."

Fortunately, all of Hyppolite’s family survived, but they remain homeless today. "It’s a blessing that my family is still alive even though they lost their homes," Hyppolite said.

She said her experiences in Haiti have changed how she sees the world. "You have to do everything you can because you never know when you are going," she said.

When she returned to the United States, Hyppolite did her best to put these experiences behind her. "Even though sometimes I feel down, I’m still doing great and moving forward," she said. "I thank God for that."

By the time Hyppolite returned to CCRI, she had missed half of the spring semester and had to work extra hard to graduate on time. She credits her professors and counselors, particularly Monica Lee, an Access program coordinator, with helping her stay on track.

"The school really understood my situation and what I had been through," she said. "My counselors helped me from beginning to end."

Hyppolite’s educational journey has been challenging. She was a college student in Haiti when her father had to flee the country for political reasons, seeking asylum in America. Hyppolite and her mother followed in 2005, leaving behind a brother and sister. She did not speak any English, but it is now her third language, including Creole and French.

"When I first came and people said ‘hi’ to me, I didn’t know what to say back," Hyppolite said.

She took English lessons with Project RIRAL, which stands for Rhode Island Regional Adult Learning, in Woonsocket and enrolled at CCRI a year later at her aunt’s suggestion.

Hyppolite was eager to continue her education, but taking college-level courses as a new English speaker proved to be a challenge. "It’s hard even now; I’m still struggling with things," Hyppolite said. "You’re not going to know everything in five years."

She said the Access program – a federally funded TRIO support program for students whose parents never completed a bachelor’s degree, meet federal low-income requirements and/or have a documented disability – was a great help.

"Being a student at Access is a good initiation," Hyppolite said. "It really helps you. Those people are always there to push you forward and tell you that you can do it."

Hyppolite graduated on May 21 with a degree in General Studies and will attend Rhode Island College this fall. She is interested in the medical field, possibly nursing, but has not settled on a discipline yet, knowing only that she wants to help people.

"With my country’s situation, if I go back I will be able to help them. We need a lot of doctors now," she said.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI graduate finds success on third try

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Deanna Dyndur of Providence is through being held back. After two false starts in college, she spent years unable to attain her dream of becoming a police officer because she lacked a higher education.

Now she has graduated from the Community College of Rhode Island with a degree in Law Enforcement and will go on to pursue a new goal: law school.

Dyndur, 38, had to change her attitude toward education before she could achieve this success, a process that took years.

"I come from a blue-collar family. Education was not emphasized or even a priority," she said. "My only expectation was to graduate from high school."

Dyndur had a difficult time in middle school and high school. She was obese as a child, which led to teasing and made her a timid student. When Dyndur expressed herself in school assignments, she could not bear to see her teachers’ criticisms and developed a fear of writing that remained an obstacle to her academic achievement for years.

"Teachers don’t realize what all that red pen does to students," she said.

Dyndur "just barely" graduated from Classical High School in Providence, with a "D-" in her final English class.

Free of school at last, Dyndur entered the work force but found that all of her friends were in college. Almost to fit in as much as to pursue an education, Dyndur enrolled at CCRI for the spring semester in 1991.

"I was not enthusiastic at all about continuing my education," she said, "but everyone I knew was in college so I gave it a shot."

Dyndur’s enrollment at CCRI did not continue into the fall and she returned to the work force as a cashier at Stop and Shop.

In 1996, Dyndur decided to make another attempt at finishing college. She realized that there was no room for her to advance at her job without further education and had also lost 80 pounds since she was last in school, which made her feel much more confident. She enrolled at Rhode Island College to take classes toward a degree in special education, but her fear of writing remained an issue.

"As the semesters progressed and I saw the writing assignments, I came up with reasons not to produce them, at times even dropping the class entirely," she said.

Dyndur was at RIC until 2001, when she left for a personal emergency.

"In 2001, my partner attempted suicide so that was more important to me [than college]," she said. "But when I look back on it, that was really just an excuse."

After leaving RIC, Dyndur’s aborted attempt at college continued to haunt her in the form of garnished wages to pay for her student loans.

She began to look for a better-paying job and decided on law enforcement, which appealed to her as a way to serve her community without requiring a degree – or so she thought.

Dyndur applied to 10 police departments in Rhode Island and Connecticut as positions became available from 2000 to 2008, making it to the final round of interviews several times, but always being passed over for better-educated candidates.

"Basically my lack of education was prohibiting me from advancing yet again," Dyndur said. "I was embarrassed."

Frustrated, Dyndur enrolled at CCRI in 2008 with the simple goal of doing well enough to graduate and be accepted to a police department. She felt that if a department offered her a job while she was still in school, she would drop out.

That attitude changed when she took a psychology class with Monica Lee, coordinator of CCRI’s Access program, which assists first-generation or low-income students.

Lee required her students to keep a regular journal and, at the end of the semester, selected Dyndur’s as the best in the class.

"That was the first positive recognition of my writing since middle school," Dyndur said. "She basically took me under her wing."

With Lee’s encouragement, Dyndur joined the Access program and began taking classes full time.

She took six courses last semester while working a full workweek at Bradley Hospital as a classroom behavior specialist. She maintained a 3.83 GPA despite this rigorous schedule and graduated as a Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society member. She also was a finalist for student commencement speaker.

During her time at CCRI, Dyndur met several teachers who inspired her, including Dr. Ronald Schertz, who called her a scholar for the first time in her life, and Assistant Professor Sheryl MacDougall, who changed Dyndur’s life with a simple comment written in her final exam.

When she opened her final exam from MacDougall’s administration of justice class she found, written in usually dreaded red pen, a note from MacDougall encouraging her to continue taking courses in law.

"The success of this school is only as good as the faculty," Dyndur said. "They are dedicated to the ultimate success of the students; that’s all they want."

Dyndur has applied to Northwestern University, Suffolk University, Roger Williams University and Northeastern University. After receiving her bachelor’s degree, she will apply to law school.

"The more classes I take in law, the more I’m fascinated by it," Dyndur said.

She said she would love to return to CCRI as an adjunct faculty member to help give back to the school that changed how she thought about learning, life and herself.

"I was no longer the kid who sat in the back of class," Dyndur said. "I finally became the student I always wanted to be."

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Sisters help inspire CCRI graduate’s success

Warwick, RI – May 24, 2010: Christopher Carbone of Cumberland has seen that what looks like a daunting setback can become an inspiration. The Community College of Rhode Island 2010 General Studies graduate put himself through school while helping care for his two younger sisters who both have serious health problems.

His adopted sister, Megan, suffers from shaken baby syndrome. She is blind and cannot walk. Carbone’s sister Karli, now 15, was born with cystic fibrosis and is frequently hospitalized. Carbone often stays with her in the hospital overnight, trading shifts with his parents.

"Between work, school and the health issues at home, it’s quite a bit to take on," Carbone said. "But it’s inspiring seeing the progress they can make having these setbacks. It’s more of an inspiration than something that holds me back."

Carbone, 24, has used that inspiration to succeed, but he did always consider going to college.

He attended high school in Vermont, where he lived with his cousin, and took automobile refinishing courses with SkillsUSA, a nonprofit organization that provides vocational training to high school and college students.

Although he enjoyed restoration and working with his hands, Carbone began to grow restless.

"The more I thought about it, I didn’t really want to be fixing someone’s wrecked car for the rest of my life," he said.

Having a lifelong interest in electrical technology, Carbone became an electrical apprentice after graduating from high school in 2004, wiring homes and installing lighting and closed circuit television systems.

Carbone enjoyed this work, but when he hurt his back on the job in July 2007, he began to have second thoughts.

What would happen if he stayed an electrician and hurt himself again when he was older and had a family? How would he support them?

"I decided it was time to do something with my head and not my body," Carbone said.

He decided to go to school for electrical engineering, which would allow him to remain in the field while also challenging his intellect.

"I feel like I’ve reached a certain degree of mastery in a lot of the areas [of an electrician]," he said. "There’s more to learn but not too much more, and I want to broaden my horizons. That’s why I’m going into the electrical engineering field."

Carbone moved back to Rhode Island in 2008 to help care for his sisters and decided to enroll at CCRI, where his mother had earned a degree in nursing.

"When I first started here I didn’t know what to expect but the faculty was very helpful," he said. "If you want it badly enough, they’re willing to help you in any way they can; it’s really great."

Carbone continued to work as an electrician to pay his way through college, maintaining a 4.0 grade point average until his last semester, and graduated with a 3.92 GPA. He had to move in with his older sister when his office and bedroom were destroyed during the record flooding in March, and he continued to help care for his younger sisters.

"It’s nice to be close to home with sisters who aren’t in the greatest of health," he said.

Carbone is considering applying to the University of Maine, Ohio State University or the University of Rhode Island to continue his education and become an electrical engineer.

Whichever school he chooses, he plans to be the first person in his family to earn a bachelor’s degree.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Flanagan art gallery hosts student exhibition

Warwick, RI – May 25, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island Flanagan Campus Art Gallery in Lincoln will present the Fine Art Seminar Spring 2010 Exhibition from May 28 to June 11, with a reception from 4 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 1.

Featured artists are Lindsay Bollinger, Candace Canady, Grace Garcia, Charis Jette, Cara Lampron, Suzie MacDonald, Drew McCoy, Christina Pezza, Oliver Scampoli, Chris Sheehan and Teyah Thorn.

The gallery is located in Room 2420 on the first floor at CCRI’s Flanagan Campus, 1762 Louisquisset Pike, Lincoln. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. For information, e-mail tmorrissey@ccri.edu.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI celebrates 45th commencement

Warwick, RI – May 21, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island conferred 1,361 associate degrees and certificates at its 45th commencement today in the Vincent A. Cullen Field House at the Knight Campus in Warwick. Some 692 graduates participated in the commencement exercises.

Several dignitaries – among them Gov. Donald Carcieri, Lt. Gov. Elizabeth Roberts, General Treasurer Frank Caprio and Attorney General Patrick Lynch – gave congratulations to the Class of 2010. CCRI President Ray Di Pasquale provided a snapshot of this year’s graduating class during his commencement address by highlighting several stories of outstanding students.

"The true meaning of commencement is to make a new beginning. While your career as a student at CCRI is coming to a close, you’re about to embark on something new with an associate degree or certificate in hand," Di Pasquale told the graduates. "For some of you, this accomplishment is a ticket to a new career. For others, it is the next step to earning a bachelor’s degree or even more. Whatever path you have chosen for yourself, you first drew the map of your future here at CCRI."

Representing his class as student commencement speaker was 38-year-old Leonardo Sime of Providence, a General Studies major who graduated as a member of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society with a 3.7 GPA. Raised in one of New York City’s worst neighborhoods, he found escape in two things: education and service. He plans to combine these two virtues by becoming a teacher.

Sime enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1990, serving in the Persian Gulf, and later re-enlisted after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and served until 2004. He moved to Providence to be closer to his sisters and enrolled at CCRI in Fall 2007. He married earlier that year and has juggled his academic responsibilities while raising a family. He also is a personal trainer, volunteers with his church and works with behaviorally troubled children in the Providence public school system.

"Let our daily obstacles hinder us not from what lies ahead. This very nature is what makes us different. It transforms us into living walking history," Sime told his classmates. "Let us move on and be confident in our attitude for the future. For it truly is what we make it. Let us move forward trusting God and be altruistic in our efforts by giving back from our experiences, strengths and hopes. Let us be the example and service our communities in a manner worthy of excellence."

At commencement rehearsal Thursday night, Alumni Association President Joshua Klemp and members of the alumni board of directors handed out superlative-type awards to graduates who attended.

Ineida Lopes Carvalho-Anderson of Pawtucket, a graduate of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program, spoke the most languages of those in attendance: English, French, Spanish, Italian and Creole.

Michelle Lacey, a Nursing graduate from Providence, won the award for the most continuous years of study to achieve a degree. She has been at CCRI since 1992.

Anne Dure, a Nursing graduate from Providence with seven children, was the graduate in attendance with the most children.

Elaine Peloquin, 61, a Nursing graduate from Warwick, was the oldest graduate in attendance.

Erin Geer, a General Studies graduate from Providence, was the student with the most family members who graduated from CCRI: four.

The association also gave a special award to a mother-son pair, Dylan and Betsy Baranski of Chepachet, graduating together. Dylan studied Law Enforcement and Betsy graduated from the Nursing program.

For more information about commencement and to view student success stories and a list of graduates, visit www.ccri.edu.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI to celebrate 45th commencement Friday

Warwick, RI – May 17, 2010: More than 1,300 associate degrees and certificates will be conferred as the college celebrates its 45th commencement at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, May 21, in the Vincent A. Cullen Field House at the Knight Campus in Warwick.

Several dignitaries – among them Gov. Donald Carcieri, Lt. Gov. Elizabeth Roberts, General Treasurer Frank Caprio and Attorney General Patrick Lynch – will give congratulations to the Class of 2010.

CCRI President Ray Di Pasquale will provide a snapshot of this year’s graduating class during his commencement address by highlighting several stories of outstanding students.

Representing his class as student commencement speaker will be 38-year-old Leonardo Sime of Providence, a General Studies major who is graduating as a member of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society with a 3.7 GPA. Raised in one of New York City’s worst neighborhoods, he found escape in two things: education and service. He plans to combine these two virtues by becoming a teacher.

Sime enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1990, serving in the Persian Gulf, and later re-enlisted after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and served until 2004. He moved to Providence to be closer to his sisters and enrolled at CCRI in Fall 2007. He married earlier that year and has juggled his academic responsibilities while raising a family. He also is a personal trainer, volunteers with his church and works with behaviorally troubled children in the Providence public school system.

The commencement exercise will be the culmination of two weeks of events honoring members of the Class of 2010 including pinning ceremonies for graduates in the radiography, dental assisting, dental hygiene, diagnostic medical sonography and nursing programs. The college also held an Access Recognition Luncheon, a Graduate Awards Luncheon and a Phi Theta Kappa Golden Tassel Luncheon in the days leading up to commencement. A physical therapist assistant pinning will take place June 5.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI employees honored in recognition program

Warwick, RI – May 13, 2010: Community College of Rhode Island employees recently were honored in four categories – Innovation and Efficiency, Technology Champion, Excellent Customer Service and Teaching Excellence – in the annual Employee Recognition Program.

James Salisbury of Johnston, assistant professor, library, received the Innovation and Efficiency Award for his contributions during the construction phase of the Knight Campus Library renovation project last summer, enabling the library to remain open and ensuring that the construction project would not affect students negatively. He took a leadership role in keeping the Warwick library staff members aware of the changes that affected their daily lives, remained cheerful under adverse conditions and focused on serving students in the best possible way.

Dr. William Johnson of Wakefield, professor of biology, was honored as Technology Champion. Students in his human anatomy course are benefitting from his unwavering commitment of time and energy in providing technology-enhanced learning resources. All of his biology labs have been videotaped, complete with voice-overs, and made available to his students using CCRI’s learning management system.

Maureen Papagalos of Pawtucket, senior word processing typist in the business department and the criminal justice/legal studies department, received the Excellent Customer Service Award. She is described as "astonishingly cheerful, friendly, knowledgeable and engaging." She well-informed about many other areas of the college and has become the "go-to" person for faculty, staff and students. While balancing a considerable workload for the two departments to which she is assigned, she often is asked to field questions having to do with other departments near her workspace and does so without hesitation and with genuine enthusiasm.

Richard Pendola of Coventry, professor of biology, received the Teaching Excellence Award. He was recognized as an instructor who maintains standards, yet is caring while dealing with his students. He makes their success a priority, even taking on additional labs so that his lecture/lab courses do not have to be split. He has repeatedly taken on new courses to teach and produced his own lab manuals to keep text book costs lower for his students. He created the department’s first developmental course and works particularly well with students who require encouragement and extra help in mastering material. On evaluations, his students continually comment on his great teaching, his availability and his interest in both the students and the subject matter.

The Employee Recognition Program was established in 1989. A committee of employees representing CCRI’s four campuses reviewed nominations and chose the winners, who were honored at a recent Employee Recognition Awards Luncheon. The winners’ names will be added to the plaque located in the Human Resources Office on the Knight Campus in Warwick.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI employees honored for years of service

Warwick, RI – May 11, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island recently honored 97 employees for their years of service to the college. Recognition for longevity was made in five-year increments starting with 10 years of service.

This year, Anthony DiRuzzo of North Providence was the first employee at CCRI to reach 45 years of service to the college, which opened in 1964.

Of the employees honored, 23 had more than 25 years of service, including 10 who have worked for the college for 40 years.

Those honored were:

45 years
Anthony DiRuzzo of North Providence

40 years
Ronald Hamill of Wakefield
Roberta Humble of Warwick
Carol Krause-Ferraioli of Providence
Mark Kundig of Providence
Michael Latina of Cranston
Patricia Morse of Cranston
Marjorie Norquist of Warwick
Ramona Skelly of Barrington
Beth Winmill of Wrentham, MA
Edward Zannella of Providence

35 years
Pamela Coletti of Cranston
Kenneth Dupuis of West Warwick
Sharon Remillard of Lincoln
Cynthia Smith of Uxbridge, MA

30 years
David Kaplan of Barrington
Raymond Kilduff of Johnston
Barbara Langan of Warwick
Edna O'Neill Mattson of North Kingstown
Cynthia Pennacchia of Cranston
Beverly Pepe of Cumberland
Mark Simpanen of Greene
Peter Woodberry of Providence

25 years
Taggart Aitken of East Providence
Marlene Albanese of North Providence
Cecile Dunbar of Pawtucket
Kathleen Dunnigan of Newport
Safiul Huda of Farmington, CT
Joanne Jacobs of Medway, MA
Edward Jacques of Providence
Catherine Johnson of Wakefield
Michael Kelly of Charlestown
William LeBlanc of Riverside
Roberta Mournighan of Warwick
Deborah Notarianni-Girard of Cranston
Cathy Picard-Tessier of Greenville
Robyn Younkin of Portsmouth

20 years
Diane Alba of Pawtucket
Karen Bouchard of Warwick
Rebecca Clark of Storrs/Mansfield, Conn.
Lynda Codega of Greenville
Michelle Connolly Brockton, MA
Donna Costa of Woonsocket
Mary Crepeau of Woonsocket
Dilcia Echavarria of Providence
Renee Gaboury of Greenville
Jerry Hatfield of Warwick
Marsha Healey-Cohen of Warwick
Cledia Holland of Providence
Nancy Macaruso of Cranston
Elizabeth Morais of Riverside
Ruby Morris-Jones of Providence
Pamela Wood of Plainville, MA

15 years
Elizabeth Arendt of North Scituate
Jerry Bernardini of Warwick
Jocelyn Bluto of Warwick
Brian Burke of Greenville
Sandra Casali of Johnston
Hilary Jansson of Narragansett
Tracy Karasinski of Warwick
Marilyn Kelly of Lincoln
Diane Lewis of Cranston
Darilyn Lydeard of Lincoln
Sheryl MacDougall of North Kingstown
Vernon Mace of Westport, Mass.
Kathleen Mangan of Cranston
Cheri Markward of Cranston
Melissa Murphy of Warwick
Dolina Quigley of North Kingstown
Louis Rainone of Cranston
Steven Rooney of Portsmouth
Marla Wallace of Worcester, MA

10 years
Andrea Babiana of Warwick
Jean Billerbeck of East Greenwich
Richard Brito of Providence
Ely Catanzarite of Coventy
Kenneth Chatelle of West Warwick
Margaret Clifton of Exeter
Allen Corneau of Tiverton
Manuel Correia of Newport
Fatima Devine of Tiverton
Kristin Dummer Foley of Warwick
Kerri Friel of Warwick
LaToya German of Providence
Robert Giovino of Providence
James Hinsey of Portsmouth
Thomas Kurowski of Warwick
Luis Malaret of Worcester, MA
Paula Marcello of North Providence
Mary Baker of Johnston
Joseph Polisena of Johnston
Anne Marie Rameika of West Kingston
Richard Robinson of Cranston
Kevin Salisbury of North Smithfield
Antranik Sarkisian of Warwick
Laurie Sherman of Clayville
Holly Susi of Cumberland

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI students admitted to Psi Beta honor society
Warwick, RI – May 10, 2010: The following Community College of Rhode Island students have been admitted to Psi Beta, the national honor society in psychology for students at community and junior colleges:

  • Danny Baker of Warwick

  • Heather Ciccarelli of Cranston

  • Tessa Constant of Chepachet

  • Amanda Sarah Fredericksen of Warwick

  • Nuryelk Gutierrez of Providence

  • Linda Iribarren of Middletown

  • Jean Lamb of Cranston

  • Amber Mansfield of Warwick

  • Henry McGinty V of Smithfield

  • Amanda Mowry of Millville, Mass.

  • Shelah Rice of Warwick

The requirements for admission to Psi Beta include a 3.0 cumulative grade point average, two courses in psychology with a "B" or better and participation in volunteer community service or other psychology-related activities.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Students to exhibit art at CCRI
Warwick, RI – May 3, 2010: All Community College of Rhode Island campuses will host student shows this month to celebrate the achievements of students taking art classes.

A Fine Arts Seminar Exhibition will be held at the Knight Campus Art Gallery in Warwick through May 6 with a reception from 4 to 7 p.m. on May 6. A Fine Art Seminar Show will be held from May 24 to June 2 at the Flanagan Campus Art Gallery in Lincoln.

Additionally, student exhibitions – exciting salon-style shows featuring works created by students in all art classes – will be held as follows:

· Monday, May 3, from 2 to 6 p.m. at the Newport County Campus
· Tuesday, May 4, from noon to 6 p.m. at the Liston Campus in Providence
· Tuesday to Friday, May 11 to 14, at the Flanagan Campus Art Gallery in Lincoln with a
reception from 4 to 7 p.m. on May 12.
· Wednesday to Friday, May 12 to 14, at the Knight Campus Art Gallery in Warwick with a
reception from 4 to 7 p.m. on May 13.

The Art Department is composed of approximately 200 Associate of Fine Arts degree-seeking candidates with an additional annual enrollment of nearly 3,000 general education students program-wide. For more information visit www.ccri.edu/art or call the Art Department at
401-825-2220.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI receives gold award in education advertising
Warwick, RI – May 5, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island recently was selected as a national Gold Award winner in the 25th annual Education Advertising Awards conducted by Higher Ed Marketing of Atlanta, Ga. The college received the Gold Award for the creative design of a fundraising kit for its capital campaign. Higher Ed Marketing also selected the college as a Merit Winner in the Annual Report and College Catalog categories.

The Educational Advertising Awards is the largest educational advertising awards competition in the country with both two- and four-year institutions competing. This year, more than 2,000 entries were received from more than 1,000 colleges, universities and secondary schools from all 50 states and several foreign countries.

CCRI was the only Rhode Island institution of higher education to receive a Gold Award in any category of the competition and its three awards were the most of any Ocean State college or university. The college’s Department of Marketing and Communications received the Gold Award for creation of a kit folder supporting CCRI’s $5.5 million capital campaign, "Imagine: The Campaign for Endless Possibilities," and the Merit Winners for design of its Annual Report of the Foundation and Alumni Association and its course catalog publications. The kit folder and annual report were designed by Richard Coren with copy by Julie Novak and photography by Dave Fischbach, all CCRI staff members.

April

‘House and Home’ on display at Flanagan Campus

Warwick, RI – April 1, 2010: The Flanagan Campus Gallery at the Community College of Rhode Island in Lincoln is showing "House and Home" by Exeter artist Michael Yefko through April 30. A reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 22, at the gallery.

In an artist’s statement, Yefko writes that "House and Home" is a show about form, function, and idea as well as dreams and loss. "I have explored the form of the house before; 10 years ago I began using the house as a stand-in for the self and as a means to exercise my anger over the loss of the natural world for the sake of the built suburban spectacle," he writes.

Now the housing bubble has burst, Yefko writes, revealing the truth of manipulative corporate greed. "I now see a double loss: the natural world by the house, and the house as a home lost in the foreclosure boom (estimated to be two million homes or families), destroying the American dream," he writes.

"The house, unlike the home, is an object created by architects and builders for clients or for speculative purposes. At times it seems like ego. It is shelter. It is also, as we have come to learn during these troubling economic times, a commodity. The object, house, is transformed by its occupation. For each of us there is a history and experience that transforms house to home. The loss of home is shattering to us, our families and community."

Yefko holds a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Rhode Island School of Design, where he also taught drawing and two-dimensional design from 1982 to 2002.

The gallery is located in Room 2420 on the first floor at CCRI’s Flanagan Campus, 1762 Louisquisset Pike, Lincoln. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For more information, e-mail tmorrissey@ccri.edu.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Infectious disease lecture rescheduled

Warwick, R.I. – April 5, 2010: The senior clinical laboratory scientist at the Rhode Island Department of Health will visit the Community College of Rhode Island Knight Campus in Warwick on Thursday, April 8, to discuss the threat of previously unknown illnesses and those that are making a comeback despite the advances of medical science over the years.

Franklin D. Meglio’s lecture was scheduled last week but was postponed because of the flooding. "New and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases" will take place at 7 p.m. in the Bobby Hackett Theater in an event sponsored by the Biology Department and the CCRI Foundation. A reception will follow, and the event is free and open to the public.

Meglio will discuss problems such as food-borne pathogens, the threat of bioterrorism and the re-emergence of some diseases. "There are diseases from the past that we thought we had gotten rid of, like mumps and measles, but they’re coming back, and I’m going to be talking about those," Meglio said.

Meglio said the presentation will appeal to the college’s health services students as well as any members of the faculty, staff or public with an interest in biology, medicine, health care or virology.

For his lecture, Meglio will draw on his 35 years of experience as a clinical laboratory scientist and educator. He has worked at the state Department of Health for 14 years, where he was the state’s lead biologist in combating the West Nile virus and was involved in a national training program to prepare hospital staff to respond to bioterrorism attacks.

Meglio also has many years of teaching experience at CCRI, the University of Rhode Island, Fatima Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital. He has taught microbiology for students in CCRI’s Nursing and Allied Health programs for 14 years.

Meglio, a native Rhode Islander, graduated from the microbiology program at the University of Missouri School of Medicine and moved back to Rhode Island when he married. He earned his master’s degree in clinical microbiology and immunology from Northeastern University and was the supervisor of the clinical immunology laboratory at Rhode Island Hospital for 24 years.


For his upcoming presentation, Meglio said he originally planned to discuss the H1N1 virus, but that topic has lost its potency as the flu season draws to a close. Instead he will focus on other issues that he believes the public should be aware of, such as salmonella, E. coli and other food-borne pathogens that he said are becoming more widespread.

"When people are exposed to these bacteria, they often don’t know food is what made them sick," Meglio said. He added that having awareness of food-borne illnesses can help people avoid them and even reduce the risk for others when they report the illness to the department.

Meglio also will talk about how diseases move throughout the world via travel and immigration. "Years ago when people came into our country, they were inspected and tested, but that’s not the case anymore," he said. "So as a result they’re bringing the diseases from the countries they came from to our shores. Many South American diseases are popping up here and we are very susceptible to them."

Meglio said that these topics may seem a bit scary, but they are important to everyone’s health. "I do think that the public should be aware of things that are going on," he said. "I am making this presentation to be informative, reporting on diseases that we have to look out for now."

Meglio is one of several speakers the CCRI Biology Department has hosted in the last few years, including experts on evolution, stem cell research and renewable energy.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI celebrates third annual All College Week

Warwick, R.I. – April 1, 2010: "All College Week 2010 – Celebrating the CCRI Experience" is the theme of the third annual college-wide celebration planned for April 9 to 18 at the Community College of Rhode Island.

Events focus on academics, technology, community service, wellness, athletics and the arts. The various programs are intended to highlight the capabilities of the largest community college in New England and to showcase the talents of students, faculty and staff. The event schedule is as follows:

CCRI Technology Open House
Friday, April 9, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Warwick campus
High school teachers and students will visit CCRI to learn more about an exciting career in technology. Students will learn more about the vast opportunities available in the technology field, meet CCRI instructors and visit our technology labs to participate in hands-on workshops about computer networking, computer repair, biotechnology, chemical technology, rehabilitative health, nursing and computer studies.


CCRI Education Expo
Saturday, April 10, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Warwick campus
Building on the success of last year’s Education Expo that was targeted specifically at adult learners, CCRI will host its second Expo geared toward all potential students. The event will include information sessions on admissions and financial aid, campus tours and a visit to some of CCRI’s labs. Deans, academic department faculty, current and former students and student services representatives will be on hand to answer any questions visitors may have. It is an opportunity for area residents to learn the scope of what CCRI has to offer and how the college potentially can help them. Visit the Expo website at www.ccri.edu/expo.
Rhode Island Summit on the Economy (Invitation only)
Monday, April 12, 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Warwick campus
Congressman James Langevin will convene a summit of 100 business and institutional leaders to discuss and plan for future economic opportunities in our state. The summit is patterned after the December 2009 Jobs and Economic Growth Forum at the White House in which CCRI President Ray Di Pasquale represented Rhode Island. Several senior members of the national administration are confirmed to attend and participate in the event.

Community Service Day
Tuesday, April 13, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., six statewide locations
Community service will be the focus of attention as students, faculty and staff spend a day volunteering at six nonprofit organizations located throughout the state. All volunteers will receive a special commemorative T-shirt in honor of their day of service as well as lunch.

Wellness Fair
Wednesday, April 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Warwick campus
CCRI welcomes students, faculty, staff and the public to learn more about the issues affecting their own health at the fifth annual Wellness Fair, where approximately 50 vendors will offer information and demonstrations on issues ranging from diabetes and cancer prevention to yoga and a zumba session from the YMCA. New vendors this year include the URI Master Gardeners and the CCRI Outdoor Adventure Club. Visit www.ccri.edu/wellness/fair-about-2010.shtml for more information.

Lectures - Cognitive Behavioral Modification
Wednesday, April 14, 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., Warwick campus
The Flanagan Campus Human Services Club is sponsoring a pair of presentations by Dr. Donald Meichenbaum, one of the most highly regarded psychotherapists of our time and a designer of cognitive behavioral modification. Dr. Meichenbaum is research director of the Melissa Institute for Violence Prevention in Miami and professor emeritus at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. For more information, and to reserve a seat, please call 401-825-2190.

Salute to the Arts
Thursday, April 15
Presentation: 9:30 a.m., Room 4090, Warwick campus
Presentation: 1:30 p.m., Art Studio 2428, Lincoln campus
Reception: 4 to 6:30 p.m., Art Gallery, Warwick campus
The college will host visiting artist Amy Freeman who will speak and lecture about her work to students. An opening reception will be held at the Knight Campus Art Gallery featuring the work of Ms. Freeman that is based upon her life and experiences using her visual interpretation to tell a story. Her sketched gestural style of drawing/painting reveals dramatic and theatrical impacts and justifies the skills representational artists must possess to be successful. Her compositional as well as structural drawing skills will be displayed at the gallery through April 23.

Thursday to Sunday, April 15 to 18, Flanagan campus
The CCRI Theater Department will present the classic William Shakespeare comedy "Much Ado About Nothing" featuring actors from the CCRI student body directed by Assistant Professor of English and Drama Theodore Clement, who has a wide range of experience as an actor and director. The play will be held in the theater on the Flanagan Campus at 7:30 p.m. on April 15, at 8 p.m. on April 16 and 17 and 2 p.m. on April 18. For ticket information, call 401-825-2219.

Professional Development Day
Friday, April 16, 8 a.m., Warwick campus
The eighth annual All College Professional Development Day will feature a presentation by President Di Pasquale on the state of the college followed by professional development sessions of personal, professional and academic importance for faculty and staff.

Hall of Fame Celebration
Sunday, April 18, 2 to 4:30 p.m., Crowne Plaza, Warwick
More than 300 guests are expected to honor new Hall of Fame inductees John S. "Jack" Renza, CCRI faculty member and managing director of Kahn, Litwin, Renza & Co. Ltd. and Laurie White, executive director of the 2,700-member Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce. Tickets cost $50 per person and more information and registration for the event can be found at www.ccri.edu/hof.
The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Public invited to Wellness Fair at CCRI

Warwick, RI – April 1, 2010: The public is invited to learn more about the issues affecting their health at the fifth annual Community College of Rhode Island Wellness Fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, April 14, at the Knight Campus, 400 East Ave., Warwick. Admission is free.

More than 50 displays will be set up in the Student Dining Commons area, including such diverse organizations as the American Diabetes Association, American Cancer Society, Appalachian Mountain Club, Center for Preventative Medicine, The Narragansett Bay Wheelmen, AIDS Care Ocean State, the URI Master Gardeners and much more.

Several CCRI organizations and departments also will be represented, including Allied Health, Dental Health and Nursing.

Participants also can take part in blood pressure and BMI screenings and see yoga and martial arts demonstrations. For more information, visit www.ccri.edu/wellness and click on Wellness Fair.
The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Public invited to CCRI Education Expo

Warwick, RI – March 30, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island will host "CCRI Education Expo 2010: Showcasing the Tools to Change Your Life," designed to give prospective students the opportunity to learn more about the college and its programs, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 10, at the Knight Campus, 400 East Ave., Warwick.

Attendees are welcome to browse the Great Hall area on the first floor of the campus and speak with college representatives who can answer questions about admissions, financial aid, scholarships, payment options, transferring previous college credit, obtaining credit for work experience, student services, programs of study and the Joint Admissions Agreement, which allows students to transfer seamlessly to the University of Rhode Island or Rhode Island College.

Attendees can speak with faculty members from many academic departments – including biotechnology, allied health, human services, nursing, dental health, computer studies and many more – and attend workshops on the topics of admission, financial aid and transferring credit to and from the college.

Other agencies also will attend the event and provide information about programs and services available. They include netWORKri, the Rhode Island Student Loan Authority, the Rhode Island Higher Education Assistance Authority and the Educational Opportunity Center, which is a federally funded TRiO program based at CCRI.

Registration is not necessary and all are welcome. For more information about the Expo, visit http://www.ccri.edu/expo.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

 

March

Scientist to discuss infectious disease in lecture

Warwick, R.I. – March 22, 2010: The senior clinical laboratory scientist at the Rhode Island Department of Health will visit the Community College of Rhode Island Knight Campus in Warwick next month to discuss the threat of previously unknown illnesses and those that are making a comeback despite the advances of medical science over the years.

Franklin D. Meglio will present "New and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases" at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 1, in the Bobby Hackett Theater in an event sponsored by the Biology Department and the CCRI Foundation. A reception will follow, and the event is free and open to the public.

Meglio will discuss problems such as food-borne pathogens, the threat of bioterrorism and the re-emergence of some diseases. "There are diseases from the past that we thought we had gotten rid of, like mumps and measles, but they’re coming back, and I’m going to be talking about those," Meglio said.

Meglio said the presentation will appeal to the college’s health services students as well as any members of the faculty, staff or public with an interest in biology, medicine, health care or virology.

For his lecture, Meglio will draw on his 35 years of experience as a clinical laboratory scientist and educator. He has worked at the state Department of Health for 14 years, where he was the state’s lead biologist in combating the West Nile virus and was involved in a national training program to prepare hospital staff to respond to bioterrorism attacks.

Meglio also has many years of teaching experience at CCRI, the University of Rhode Island, Fatima Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital. He has taught microbiology for students in CCRI’s Nursing and Allied Health programs for 14 years.

Meglio, a native Rhode Islander, graduated from the microbiology program at the University of Missouri School of Medicine and moved back to Rhode Island when he married. He earned his master’s degree in clinical microbiology and immunology from Northeastern University and was the supervisor of the clinical immunology laboratory at Rhode Island Hospital for 24 years.


For his upcoming presentation, Meglio said he originally planned to discuss the H1N1 virus, but that topic has lost its potency as the flu season draws to a close. Instead he will focus on other issues that he believes the public should be aware of, such as salmonella, E. coli and other food-borne pathogens that he said are becoming more widespread.

"When people are exposed to these bacteria, they often don’t know food is what made them sick," Meglio said. He added that having awareness of food-borne illnesses can help people avoid them and even reduce the risk for others when they report the illness to the department.

Meglio also will talk about how diseases move throughout the world via travel and immigration. "Years ago when people came into our country, they were inspected and tested, but that’s not the case anymore," he said. "So as a result they’re bringing the diseases from the countries they came from to our shores. Many South American diseases are popping up here and we are very susceptible to them."

Meglio said that these topics may seem a bit scary, but they are important to everyone’s health. "I do think that the public should be aware of things that are going on," he said. "I am making this presentation to be informative, reporting on diseases that we have to look out for now."

Meglio is one of several speakers the CCRI Biology Department has hosted in the last few years, including experts on evolution, stem cell research and renewable energy.
The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI to induct Renza, White into Hall of Fame

Warwick, RI – March 11, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island will induct two individuals who have made significant contributions to the growth of CCRI to its Hall of Fame during a ceremony held at the Crowne Plaza in Warwick from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 18.

The college will recognize Jack Renza, managing partner of Kahn, Litwin, Renza and Co., Ltd. and a longtime CCRI faculty member, and Laurie White, president of the Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce, as the 37th and 38th member of the CCRI Hall of Fame for their substantial contributions to the creation and evolution of the college.

Renza, a resident of Scituate, was the first CPA to join CCRI’s full-time faculty in 1975.
Since then, he has taught accounting to thousands of students. Renza also has undertaken leadership roles in several high visibility activities at the college, including serving as co-chairman of CCRI President Ray Di Pasquale’s inauguration. He is chairman of the college’s Budget and Resource Committee as well as the highly successful "Imagine" capital campaign.

Renza is involved in a number of professional associations and also provides volunteer support to more than a dozen community and educational organizations. He is an honorary trustee at Bryant University and serves as a mentor to the Year Up organization.

As president of the Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce, White has been instrumental in promoting the visibility of CCRI to a wide audience of business and community leaders, recognizing the critical role that the college plays in the state’s workforce development. She appointed President Di Pasquale to the Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce’s Board of Trustees and the college was immediately immersed in highly visible workforce development issues. White and the Chamber are involved in several other college events. She presented, along with college officials, at a fundraising forum in Boston sponsored by the National Association of College and University Business Officers.

White, who resides in North Kingstown with her husband, Jim Taricani, participates in more than a dozen community and professional organizations as diverse as the Rhode Island Historical Society and the Rhode Island Quality Institute.
During the induction ceremony Renza and White will be presented with a plaque and an award in honor of their accomplishments. A tribute video including photos of the inductees throughout their lives and interviews with former colleagues will be shown.

The CCRI Foundation established the Hall of Fame in celebration of the college’s 30th anniversary in October 1994. It honors individuals who have excelled in their careers and made significant contributions to the mission of the college. Since 1994, six induction ceremonies have celebrated the accomplishments of 36 Hall of Fame members.

A new Hall of Fame kiosk displaying information about each inductee is being constructed and will be on display this fall near the main entrance of the second floor of the Knight Campus in Warwick.

For reservations, or to read about past inductees, visit www.ccri.edu/hof.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

Faculty, staff to exhibit art at Knight Campus

Warwick, R.I. – March 12, 2010: The Knight Campus Art Gallery will show the work of 19 Art Department faculty and staff members from March 11 to April 8. An opening reception will be held from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 16.

The artwork ranges from traditional media such as oil painting, drawing or porcelain to photography and mixed media painting combined with photography. Artists in the Faculty and Staff Exhibition are: Mazin Adam, Mary Benton, Sally Caswell, Rebecca Clark, Linda DiFrenna, Susan Fossati, Keith Fox, Trish Hurley, Maureen Kelman, Anna Jane Kocon, Michele C. Leavitt, Yvonne Leonard, Viera Levitt, James Montford, Tom Morrissey, Kate Oggel, Tina Tryforos, Nancy E. Wyllie and Mark Zellers.

The exhibition includes a mixed media installation by Morrissey, and visitors can watch a film short Wyllie created depicting recent immigrants and CCRI students’ view of America’s ongoing struggle with the perception of newcomers and outsiders.

The gallery is located in Room 3500, on the third floor of the round building at the Warwick campus, 400 East Ave. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday. For more information, visit www.ccri.edu/art/galleries or e-mail gallery director Viera Levitt at knightgallery@ccri.edu.

The Art Department is composed of approximately 200 Associate of Fine Arts degree-seeking candidates, with an additional annual enrollment of nearly 3,000 general education students program-wide.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

CCRI Players to present short plays and scenes

Warwick, R.I. – Feb. 25, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island Players will present "Blocks, Blacks & Bentwoods," a student showcase of short plays and scenes, March 4 to 7 at the Knight Campus, 400 East Ave., Warwick.

Beginning in the 2004-05 season, the CCRI Players have allotted one mainstage production each year to showcase the work of talented theater students not only as actors, but also as directors. "Blocks, Blacks & Bentwoods" places the emphasis on student performances in a variety of short plays and scenes, supported by a minimum of technical elements. Legendary director Peter Brook famously maintained in his book of the same name that valid and vital theater can be created within "an empty space." This year’s showcase intends to validate that assertion by applying some of the essentials of theater performance that students have learned in the classroom and through their involvement in previous productions.

The material has been drawn from an assortment of sources. Gladys Cole, a member of the Class of 2009, will perform her own original one-woman play "Only Mondays," under the direction of Professor Jeffrey A. Butterworth. Student director Billy Flynn helms "The Mystery at Twickham Vicarage," a comedy by David Ives that spoofs the style of Agatha Christie mysteries. His cast includes Ryan Boudreau, Tiffany Daniels, Benjamin Lovejoy, Laura Minadeo and David Sackal. Professor Bert Silverberg will direct two 10-minute plays: " Hanging On" by Claudia Haas, co-starring Kim Hashway and Emily Mabrouk; and "Pie and the Sky" by Vanessa David, featuring Elizabeth Almeida and Adam Florio. In addition, the program includes scenes originally presented last semester in Professor Theodore Clement’s Acting II class, as well as audition packages prepared by some of this year’s CCRI Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship candidates and their scene partners. Clement also serves as overall supervisor and coordinator for "Blocks, Blacks & Bentwoods," and the Production Stage Manager is Craig Alix.

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 4; 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 5 and 6; and at 2 p.m. Sunday. All tickets cost $5 each. Call (401) 825-2219 for reservations.

New course teaches how to dress for interview success

Warwick, R.I. – March 2, 2010: If workplace wisdom says to dress for the position you want to have, why would prospective employees do anything different during a job interview? The Community College of Rhode Island’s Center for Workforce and Community Education is teaching job applicants how to dress for success with a new course this spring called "So You Think You’ll Get Hired Wearing That?"

The course focuses on how to dress for a job interview, and students will learn how to make the best use of their wardrobe to make a strong and professional first impression. They also will receive personalized grooming and fashion tips from instructor Patricia King, a modeling and fashion consultant with 27 years of experience.

"You will come away being confident in what you wear and I think knowing that you look good helps so much because it’s one less thing that you have to be concerned with," King said. "Confidence is knowing that you’re walking in making the right impression."

King said that small details such as hairstyle, the fit of one’s clothes and the colors one chooses all add up to form a first impression – but not everyone is aware of the importance of physical appearance. "Professional grooming standards as far as facial hair, piercings and fragrance are just not common sense; it’s something that has to be taught," King said.

This is true for men and women, and the course caters to both. Though topics such as makeup and facial hair are gender-specific, many of the course’s topics are universal, such as what colors to choose and what to do about tattoos. Students will cover many topics firsthand, wearing their professional wardrobe to class for constructive criticism and friendly critiquing. King advised that a sense of humor may be important for this part of the course. "If I accuse you of wearing your father’s suit, hopefully you can laugh at yourself," she said.

This is the first time that a course of this kind is being offered at CCRI, but King has experience speaking with classes of graduating students about how they should prepare for a job interview. She has also instructed international business students on how to cross cultural barriers regarding fashion. Aside from advising for the business community, King is the director of Safari Photography, which represents models and actors both locally and in larger markets.
"So You Think You’ll Get Hired Wearing That?" will be offered in two sessions. The first will meet from 9 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays March 23 through April 1, at the Knight Campus in Warwick. The next session will run from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, April 13 to 22, at the Flanagan Campus in Lincoln.

Both sessions will meet four times each, and the cost of enrollment is $54 plus a $5 registration fee. Learn more at www.ccri.edu/cwce.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses. The college’s Center for Workforce and Community Education offers a range of short-term and noncredit education opportunities in the areas of workforce training, literacy services, leadership development, community education and personal enrichment as well as customized credit and noncredit programs for industry sectors and business clients. The division serves nearly 30,000 adults throughout Southeastern New England annually.

CCRI to present free ‘ A Time to Dance’ performance

Warwick, R.I. – March 1, 2010: The Charles Sullivan Fund for the Arts and Humanities, in association with the Community College of Rhode Island Players, will present "A Time to Dance," a magical fusion of storytelling and creative dance written and performed by Libby Skala, at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 16, in the Bobby Hackett Theater at the college’s Knight Campus, 400 East Ave. Admission is free.

Skala has charmed audiences over the last few years with her internationally acclaimed solo play "LiLiA!" about her Oscar-nominated grandmother, Lilia Skala. Now she will present "A Time to Dance" about Lilia’s younger sister, Austrian modern dancer and award-winning dance therapy pioneer Elizabeth "Lisl" Polk. Skala interweaves spoken word, improvised movement and creative dance to portray her great-aunt, who dances to her own dazzling stories of a turbulent life spanning the 20th century.

In addition to her performance, Skala also will conduct a participatory acting workshop at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 15, in the Bobby Hackett Theater, which also is free and open to the public.

In "A Time to Dance," Polk, born in 1902 Vienna, survives two world wars, immigrates to New York, endures the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, and dances the Macarena on her hundredth birthday. The daughter of a Catholic mother and Jewish father, she deals with the conflicting forces of anti-Semitism in her own home as she dreams of becoming a famous dancer. Met with opposition from an autocratic father, she finds unexpected ways to fulfill her dream while struggling to emerge from the shadow of her famous older sister. This intriguing modern dancer unexpectedly steals the show, proving herself to be the riotous and controversial star of her own life.

Polk’s broad professional background marked her as one of the country’s authorities in teaching the joy of movement to emotionally, physically and mentally disabled children. She had a long and rich career, teaching dance at every age level from preschoolers to adult education classes and in settings ranging from housing projects to college campuses. Her early music and dance studies included not only ballet, but Dalcroze eurhythmics, modern dance and gymnastics.

She performed as a concert dancer and later acquired a physical education license, enabling her to launch her own dance studio in Austria. In the United States, she pioneered creative dance and worked with children at the Children’s Center for Creative Arts at Adelphi University, as well as in her own studio. She was a charter member of the American Dance Therapy Association, co-founded the National Dance Teachers Guild and taught methodology in teaching dance to children in Adelphi’s dance department. In 1995, at the age of 93, she was honored with a lifetime achievement award as a chief pioneer in dance/movement therapy at the American Dance Therapy Association’s 30th annual convention.

Playwright/actress Skala has performed "A Time to Dance" at The New York International Fringe Festival, in Vancouver as part of the 25th anniversary season of Pacific Theatre, in Germany at TU Dresden and Theater im Greenhouse in Berlin and at the London Fringe Theatre Festival, where she won the "Best Solo Performer" Award. The show also has received an award from The Pandella Cultural Fund in Switzerland. The New York Times wrote, "Ms. Skala’s convincing portrayal is the reason Polk is brought to life with such vibrancy."

Her non-solo work includes the role of Viola in the St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival's production of "Twelfth Night" and Jeffrey Sweet’s "Value of Names" at Theatre J in Washington, D.C. She appeared with Nicole Kidman in the film "Birth."

The running time is 70 minutes. The show is presented free of charge through the generosity of the Charles Sullivan Fund for the Arts and Humanities, which was created in honor of retired longtime CCRI professor, CCRI Hall of Fame inductee and arts advocate Charles Sullivan. The fund supports a variety of cultural opportunities at the community college’s four campuses.

For more information about the show, visit www.ATimetoDance.homestead.com.

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

February

CCRI has second-highest spring enrollment in history

Warwick, R.I. – Feb. 24, 2010: Enrollment at the Community College of Rhode Island is the second-highest of any spring semester, with an increase of 7.4 percent over last spring, and the college had the highest full-time equivalent enrollment for spring in its 45-year history, President Ray Di Pasquale announced today.

According to final enrollment numbers, 17,192 students are taking classes at CCRI’s four campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and at two satellite locations in Downcity Providence and Westerly this spring. That number is a gain of 1,187 students over last spring.

In fact, the spring enrollment was surpassed only by the Spring 1993 semester, when the state instituted a special tuition waiver with no income qualifications for senior citizens and the unemployed. Some 17,627 students enrolled that semester. The waiver later was modified to consider income, and the number of waivers substantially decreased in subsequent semesters.

The record-setting full-time equivalent or FTE is 10,408, or 718 more than last spring: also a 7.4 percent increase. FTE represents the full-time equivalent for a group of students; for example, two half-time students equal one FTE. CCRI students also are taking 7.4 percent more credit hours, 144,875 as compared with 134,833 last spring.

Enrollment is up at all campuses, with the satellite at Westerly Middle School seeing a 24.5 percent increase in enrollment over last spring. Distance learning also increased 37.5 percent over last spring; some 1,338 students are taking classes online this semester.

Di Pasquale said the increase is not surprising given the economic conditions in the state and the unprecedented national attention that community colleges have been receiving for providing workforce training and affordable educational options.

"More and more people are turning to their community colleges to give them the skills they need to get back into the work force or to advance their earning potential," he said. "Here at CCRI, we continue our work to provide Rhode Islanders with the degree, certificate or skills required to gain or retain employment. Meanwhile, we are collaborating with other state agencies and industry partners to be sure we are offering offer the kinds of programs that will produce the workers needed in the state."

The Community College of Rhode Island, New England’s largest community college, has full-service campuses in Warwick, Lincoln, Providence and Newport and operates satellites in Downcity Providence and Westerly. CCRI enrolls an average of nearly 18,000 students annually in credit courses and thousands more in noncredit and workforce training classes and programs.

New exhibition opening at CCRI Lincoln gallery

Warwick, R.I. – Feb. 18, 2010: Middletown resident Paula Marie Visnoski will exhibit "Revelation: One Woman’s Journey" at the Community College of Rhode Island’s Flanagan Campus Art Gallery from March 1 to 19. An opening reception will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, March 4.

This exhibition features a selection of recent works that visually translate Visnoski’s creative and life journey through watercolor, drawing, painting, photography and graphic arts. She will give an informal talk and discussion session at 7:30 p.m. during the March 4 reception.

Born and raised in Hudson, Mass., Visnoski said she became aware of her artistic abilities when she was about 5 years old. "I couldn't stop drawing on things," she said. Throughout her academic years, her art teachers molded her abilities into what would be a lifelong pursuit and she was named "Most Artistic" among her high school class. She studied with Lawrence Cron, known for his watercolors and graphic design work, and attended Worcester Art Museum and Worcester State College, studying fine art, graphic design and photography.

In 2006 she became a Member of the National Association of Photoshop Professionals and was an Editors’ Choice winner for her photograph "Wetlands." She also has participated in national juried art exhibitions and competitions and was a 2008 winner for her watercolor painting "Predators & Prey" in the international juried online art exhibition and e-zine presented by The Manhattan Arts International website titled "Celebrate the Healing Power of Art 2008."

In 2009, her work was published in New Art Review Publications "Dimensions of Disclosure," featuring the top new artistic talents of the year. Also last year, her photograph "Into the Light" was a finalist in the International Photography Juried Competition sponsored by Canon and Photographer’s Forum Magazine in the "Best of Photography 2009."

Most recently, Visnoski received four awards for her watercolor painting "Mortality" in The American Art Awards (online) juried art competition. Visit her website at www.pmvART.com.

The gallery is located in Room 2420 on the first floor at CCRI’s Flanagan Campus, 1762 Louisquisset Pike, Lincoln. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. For more information, e-mail tmorrissey@ccri.edu.

CCRI to host lecture on history of Western worldviews

Warwick, R.I. – Feb. 8, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island welcomes history professor and award-winning author Glenn Sunshine to present, "How we got here: History and worldview," at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 11, in the Bobby Hackett Theater at the Knight Campus in Warwick.

Sunshine, a professor of history at Central Connecticut State University, will discuss the ways Western worldviews have developed from the Renaissance to the present. During the presentation, he will focus on the issue of modernity: why it arose, how it evolved, why it collapsed, and its implications for contemporary society.

"My lecture will be accessible to scholars and to people who don’t have much, if any, background in the subject," Sunshine said.

Sunshine has published three books and numerous articles on history, theology and culture online and on both sides of the Atlantic. His latest book, "Why you think the way you do: The story of Western worldviews from Rome to home" (Zondervan, 2009), received the 2006 Acton Institute Book Grant. He has taught a variety of Bible, history and worldview seminars and courses around the United States and in Europe. He is also the content consultant for Wide Angle, a worldview program.

The event is sponsored by the CCRI Foundation, a nonprofit that secures external support for the college and its programs and services. The event is open to the public and there is no fee to attend.

Local ‘ Mother Daze’ author to visit CCRI

Warwick, R.I. – Feb. 4, 2010: The public is invited to hear Christine Carr, author of "Mother Daze: Tales From the Imperfect Playground," read from her work and answer questions at 1 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 15, in Room 4080 at the Community College of Rhode Island’s Knight Campus, 400 East Ave., Warwick.

From play dates and soccer games to music lessons and tutoring sessions, today’s mothers have to do it all. Through "Mother Daze," Carr lets them know they are not alone as they try to be the best parents they can. Throughout her stories of misplaced toys, temper tantrums and experiences as a physical education teacher, Carr offers observations that will ring true with many mothers.

Carr earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Rhode Island in 1993 and began her career as a physical education teacher in East Greenwich. She earned her master’s degree in the administration of physical education and health education; her thesis research project was based on the over-scheduling of today’s youth and how it relates to future burnout rates among athletes. She lives in South Kingstown with her husband, Andrew, and three children.

Resurrecting Ophelia’ on display at Flanagan Campus

Warwick, R.I. – Feb. 2, 2010: The Flanagan Campus Gallery at the Community College of Rhode Island in Lincoln is showing "Resurrecting Ophelia," a solo exhibition of photographs by Kalliope Amorphous through Feb. 19.

Amorphous is an artist working exclusively with the self-portrait photograph in an ongoing exploration of identity, archetype and myth. Her photographic renderings of Ophelia are a journey through a dreamy, womb-like atmosphere where the boundaries between sheer horror and ethereal beauty are often blurred. Kalliope said her interpretation "focuses on Ophelia’s resurrection and her search for answers."

In these images, created not underwater but through the use of in-camera techniques, Amorphous has created various visual interpretations of the character while maintaining a cohesive poetic theme. For the artist, these images represent both the demanding and the contemplative ghost who is simultaneously flowing and frozen in time. Amorphous aims to "give strength and voice to Ophelia’s perceived madness and dispossession. She is the confrontational ghost of the alienated soul. On another level, I am also playing with the idea of water as both womb and tomb. That is, the element of water as it relates to birth, death and regression. I am working through personal ideas of isolation and alienation in these images but, ultimately, the viewer may take something from them that is entirely different."

Her work ranges from interpretations of pre-existing iconography to compositions meant purely to provoke and challenge perceptions. Self-taught in photography, she takes an intuitive approach to composition and lighting and works without the aid of professional lighting or studio equipment. "I am not a photographer or a narcissist, but a performance artist with a camera. I want to push the boundaries of what I define as self and other by playing with ideas of identity, gender, archetype and the myriad ways in which they can be represented." She typifies a new wave of largely self-taught artists who work independently of establishment art schools, public institutions and mainstream movements in art and who are becoming widely known as unique and independent artists, primarily through the Internet. She has exhibited her work throughout the United States and Europe.

The gallery is located in Room 2420 on the first floor at CCRI’s Flanagan Campus, 1762 Louisquisset Pike, Lincoln. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. For more information, e-mail tmorrissey@ccri.edu.

AS220 artists and friends exhibit work at CCRI

Warwick, R.I. – Feb. 2, 2010: AS220 artists and friends will exhibit "Do It! Show It! Sing It! Work It!" at the Community College of Rhode Island’s Knight Campus Art Gallery from Feb. 4 to March 4. An opening reception will be held from 5.30 to 7.30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 4, featuring a talk at 6 p.m. by AS220 founder and Artistic Director Umberto Crenca about 25 years of creative happenings there.

AS220 is a nonprofit community arts space in downtown Providence whose mission is to provide an nonjuried and uncensored forum for the arts The exhibition is a celebration of all the creative energy of all those who help to make AS220 a vital community art space.

Artists featured in the exhibition include Mia Acosta, Alexis Avedisian, Dawn Beagan, Moira Brady, Stephen Brownell, Nicole Chesney, Paul Clancy + Alyn Carlson, Jonathan Clark, Susan Clausen, Umberto Crenca, Susan Dansereau, Carmel Dundon, Lyn Goeringer, Edgardo Gonzales, Hope Hardesty, Scot Lapham, Viera Levitt, CW Roelle, Miguel Rosario, Ashley Vick, Anthony Villavincencio, Leigh Waldron-Taylor, Neal T. Walsh and Uriah Zoegar.

For more information about AS220 and this exhibition, contact Neal T. Walsh at (401) 831-9327 or neal@as220.org. Visit the organization online at www.as220.org.

The gallery is located in Room 3500, on the third floor of the round building at the Warwick campus, 400 East Ave. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday. For more information, e-mail gallery director Viera Levitt at knightgallery@ccri.edu.

January

CCRI announces fall 2009 dean’s list

Warwick, R.I. – Jan. 13, 2010: The Community College of Rhode Island announces that 1,158 students have been named to the dean’s list for the fall 2009 semester.

Students enrolled in a degree program who completed 12 credits this fall with a grade point average of 3.25 or higher with no grade lower than "C" are eligible for this scholastic honor.

Those honored are:

Justin Abatiello
Rebecca Abt
Michael Aceto
Sean Acker
Peter Adam
Kaylor Adams
Daniel Adams
Nathan Adams
Samuel Adewumi
Michelle Aguiar
Jennifer Aguiar
Rosa Aguiar
Juan Aguon
Neil Alahverdian
Angela Albro
Kristyn Alexander
Craig Alix
Lindsey Allard
Erin Allard
Kayla Allard
Joshua Allard
Ryan Allenson
Kimberly Allsup
Anna Almeida-Tenreiro
Jason Alton
Emily Alvarez
Deja Alves
Vanda Alves
Jessica Alves
Sindy Alvisures
Katherine Amato
Ana Ambrose
Nelson Amparo
Meixiang An
Adriano Andrade Jr.
Alisha Andrade
Antonio Andreoli
Marc Antaya
Elisa Aquilante-Bergantino
Malgorzata Armatys
Carmen Arroyo
Paula Arruda
Amber Arruda
Carlos Asian Nunez
Andrey Atamanchuk
Anthony Atella III
Heather Aubin
Mohammad Awad
Kashina Ayala
Antoun Bahit
Lindsey Bailer
Jennifer Baker
Charles Baker
Elizabeth Baldwin
Shannon Balko
Patrick Ballard
Nicole Bannon
Kathleen Bannon
Emanuel Baptista
Shannon Barbosa
Eric Barron
Denise Basiliere
Andrea Bassi
Siobhan Beatty
Peter Beckwith
Leslie Bediako
Andrew Belanger
Jennifer Belisle
Caitlin Bellucci
Brian Belson
Raymond Beltran
Jeffrey Bennard
Kassi Benson
Kirstie Bequette
Karen Berard
Eric Berardis
June Berdos
Louis Berger
Stephanie Bernier
Brian Bessette
Erin Bessette
Christine Bileau
Lacey Binns
John Bishaw
Joseph Bishop
Melissa Blackmar
Michael Blais
Jarrod Blanchette
Britnee Bloschichak
Harrison Boakye
Blake Bogue
Melissa Boisvert
Jessica Borden
Amanda Borges
Daniel Boss
Bryan Bowes
Rita Bowley
Nicholas Boyd
James Brady
Laura Brasil
Carrie Breakell
Christopher Brear
Gregory Breard
Sarah Brenneman
Christina Brodeur
Alexandra Brodeur
Sarah Brodeur
Erin Bromley
Robert Brothers
Erin Brousseau
Ashley Brown
Amy Brown
Allyson Brown
Michael Brown
Dana Brown
Melissa Brown
Rachel Brown
Christiana Brucato-Holm
Kollie Bryant
Jessica Burdon
Joseph Burgio
Cort Burke
Kaitlyn Burke
Hayley Burkett
Georgiy Burkovskiy
Audrey Burniston
Shane Burson
Michael Butta
Donna Butterworth
Amil Byleckie
Diana Cabral
Jeffrey Caldarelli
Melanie Calderon
Michelle Calouro
Mathew Caluscusao
Courtney Camara
Nicole Cann
Jacqueline Canola
Justin Capaldi
Joseph Capuano
Sean Cardoso
Justin Cardoza
Kerry Carlini
Robert Carman
Domenic Carnevale
Laima Carp
Mathew Carpenter
Michael Carrasquillo
Michael Carriere
Robert Carroll
Joshua Cascione
Devan Casey
Monica Castellanos
Yvonne Causey
Zachary Causey
Robert Cavallaro
Gregory Caya
Alex Ceballos
Kelly Chabot
Caitlyn Chalut
Sandra Chamberlin
Rebecca Chambers
Carrie Chandonnait
Seney Chang
Megan Chapdelaine
Brittany Chapman
Cayla Charlonne
Danielle Chasse
Nicholas Chasse
Mark Chauvin
Feifei Chen
Michael Chenot
Jaime Chevalier
Erica Chiappone
Ashley Chin
Stephanie Choiniere
Cori Christie
Waymund Chu
Michelle Chute
Sofia Cifuentes
Alesia Cimaglia
Giovanni Cintolo
Stephanie Clark
Roderick Clark
David Clarkin
Nicole Clemens
Mallory Coelho
Dionne Colafrancesco
Ross Colardo
Kathy Cole
Krystal Coleman
Roberta Collins
Nicole Colon
Alexandra Comella
Fernanda Consuegra
Cynthia Conti
Marilyn Cook
Wayne Cook Jr.
Dana Cook
Victoria Cooke
Dana Cooper
Kristin Cordeiro
Kevin Cordeiro
Melissa Corey
Ariana Corey
Haley Cormier
Samantha Cornell
Samantha Corrigan
Ashley Corsa
Terri-Denise Cortvriend
Michael Costa
Leonardo Costa
Joao Costa
Jennifer Costa
Emily Costa
Audra Costa
Gilmar Costa
Jose Costa
Lia Costa-Pierce
Travis Cote
Laura Coulombe
Erin Counts
Berta Couto
Zelia Couto
Robin Cox
Samantha Coye
Charles Craige
Mathew Craven
Gina Crawford
Lauren Crawford
Andrew Croll
Kimberley Croxford
Lisa Crudale
Brittany Curato
Timothy Cureton
Kayla Curran
Joanne Custodio
Robert Cutler
Christopher Cybulski
Alissa Da Silva
Michael Dacosta
Casey D'Ambra
Cheryl D'Amico
Brianna D'Andrea
Sari Danh
Paul Daniel
Tiffany Daniels
Maureen Daniels
Nicholas Danielson
Allison Danielson
Melissa D'Antuono
Brandon D'Arezzo
Brad Davide
Seth Davis
Manuel Davis
Giovanni De La Zerda
Lisa DeCesare
Lauren DeConte
Joseph DeCurtis Jr.
Angelo DeFeo
Mario Delcid
Nicholas Delfino
Brenda Delgado
Alexander Dell
Elizabeth Dempsey
Ryan Dennegan
Peter Denomme
Deborah Derbander
Michael Derderian
Kellie Deschene
Justin Desforges
Heather Desmarais
Erika Desmarais
Michelle Despres
Rosemary Dever
Sadie Devlin
Elizabeth Di Ruggiero
Fatoumata Diallo
Melix Diaz
Elizabeth DiBiasio
Robert DiCristoforo
Christopher Didone
Christine Dietzel
Rebecca Dillon
Emily Dimant
Marc Dimartino
Adam Dingley
Erika Dion
Moumy Diop
Rebecca DiPietro
Stefan DiPippo
Patricia DiRaimo
Angelo DiSpirito
Patrick Dodd
Chad Doire
Kaylyn Domenici
Qi Dong
Rebecca Donovan
Danielle Donovan
Thomas Donovan
Scott Donovan
Lydia Dorsey
Rachel Dow
Charles Downs IV
Zachary Doyon
Samuel Doyon
Elizabeth Dubois
Candice Dufault
Christina Duffy
Benjamin Dugas
Ashley Duggan
Casandra Dumay-Aldana
Melissa Dumont
Jessie Duperre
Christopher Durand
Chelsea Durante
Deanna Dyndur
Kristian Dzilenski
Robin Eaton
Jasmin Edouard
Amelia Elling
Jaime Elliott
Ardem Elmayan
Christian Enriquez
Michael Erdahl
Scott Estrela
Valerie Ethier
Linda Evans
Jessica-Lyn Evers
Johnathan Evon
Alexandra Factor
Justin Falandys
Anuoluwapo Famodimu
Lucy Fandino
Robert Fanion III
Clifford Fantel Jr.
Andrew Farhoumand
Ashley Farney
Adam Farrell
Amanda Fay
Marie Feeney
Emily Feeney
Nicholas Felicetti
Jaimie Fellela
Crystal Fenner
Sarah Ferguson
Brendan Fernandes
Meghan Fernandes
Diana Ferrara
Marlena Ferrell
Robert Ferris
Michael Ferrucci
Gregory Filippo
Sarah Firth
Mathew Fitzpatrick
Lindsay Flamand
Laura Flores
Jonathan Flynn
Wing Fong
Jordan Fongeallaz
Alexandria Fontes
Julianne Forchione
Renee Ford
Heather Forthun
Rowan Fortune
Jessica Foster
Andrew Fournier
Jessica Fox
Jason Fox
Crystal Francoeur
Jill Frechette
Amanda Fredericksen
Ruben Frias
Melissa Fricot
Elizabeth Fromich
Enlly Fuentes
Mathew Furia
Anthony Fusco
Chelsea Gadoury
Michelle Galano
Stephen Galasso
Grace Garcia
Angel Garcia
Alexsie Garcia
Leidy Garcia
Brittany Gardner
Melissa Gareau
Julie Garosshen
Ryan Garvey
Kathleen Gaskin
Christina Gaudette
Heidi Gaudlap
Marian Gaus
Rene Gauthier
Angel Gavidia
Sean Geary
Megan Gebski
Edward Gelsomino
Anthony Gemma
Albert Gesualdi
Christina Gianfrancesco
Nicole Gilbert
Kevin Gilbride
Daniel Gimple
Lucas Ginsberg
William Gionis
Carlos Giron
Alexa Gladstone
Susy Gluchacki
Troy Godin
Corey Goffinet
Mathew Golderese
Alexis Goley
Nicole Golotto
Karl Golz
Brian Gomes
Margaret Gomes
Marc Gonsalves
Josue Gonzalez
Robert Goode
Lucas Goodrich
Rachael Gorman
Joshua Gorton
Brittany Gough
Sean Grace
Gerard Grandpre
Jenna Grange
Robert Grant III
Jessie Green Jr.
Harold Greene II
Robert Gregson
Kaitlyn Griffin
Irene Grindle
Marissa Groleau
Carolin Guerrero
Brian Guertin
Terin Guessferd
Ryan Guglielmetti
Diane Guli
Nuryelk Gutierrez
Michael Gyasi
Brenda Haarala
Erica Haley
Nicole Hall
Erin Hallene
Tiffany Haltom
Valerie Hamel
Vincent Hammond
Anta Hane
Carly Hanson
Mohamed Hantash
Nathalie Harbin
Richard Harnedy
James Harrington
Patricia Harrington
Amanda Hart
Hannah Harvey
Nicolette Hathaway
Margaret Hathaway
Kelly Havican
Brian Hayes
Elizabeth Hayward
Lashonda Hazard
Vanessa Heard
Loralei Heater
Maria Henao
Jessica Henneberry
Margaret Hennessey
Thomas Henry
Christopher Herbert
Anastasia Hernandez
Nicholas Heroux
Derryck Hesford
Daniel Hewson
Angelique Higgins
Edward Hilbert
Shannon Hilton
Daniel Hinsley
Laura Hirmas
Amanda Hitchener
Nicholas Hoetzel
Laura Hoffman
Theresa Holt
Douglas Hood
Meghan Hook
Brent Hopkins
Daniel Hopkins
Daniel Hopkins
Laura Horta
Holly Horton
Brigette Houle
Dawn Houlihan
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Last Updated: 11/20/14